Short Stories – Intrepid Mouse http://intrepidmouse.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 16:54:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://intrepidmouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Short Stories – Intrepid Mouse http://intrepidmouse.com/ 32 32 ‘Love, Death & Robots’ is growing https://intrepidmouse.com/love-death-robots-is-growing/ https://intrepidmouse.com/love-death-robots-is-growing/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 15:50:52 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/love-death-robots-is-growing/ Netflix recently released Season 2 of Love, Death & Robots, an anthology show that adapts short stories into animated films. Science fiction author Zach Chapman thinks the new season is a big improvement over season 1, with fewer episodes that feel silly or underdeveloped. “I think these stories are a lot more cohesive,” Chapman says […]]]>


Netflix recently released Season 2 of Love, Death & Robots, an anthology show that adapts short stories into animated films. Science fiction author Zach Chapman thinks the new season is a big improvement over season 1, with fewer episodes that feel silly or underdeveloped.

“I think these stories are a lot more cohesive,” Chapman says in episode 469 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy Podcast. “I wouldn’t say there is an episode that I didn’t like in this season, while there are quite a few that I didn’t like in season 1.”

Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy host David Barr Kirtley was happy to see the series move in a more serious direction, after a first season that seemed primarily aimed at teenagers. “This show started off as an attempted reboot Heavy metal, so he had that kind of aesthetic, ”he says. “And that doesn’t particularly bother me, but I would really like the show to have more of the aesthetic of just portraying what’s going on in fantasy and sci-fi news over the past few decades.”

Sadly, the show still looks too much like a boy’s club, with each season 2 episode adapted from a story by a male writer. Fantastic author Erin Lindsey hopes that will change in season 3. “There is no excuse for the lack of diversity in voices,” she said. “There is a ton of science fiction, including classic science fiction, written by women and people of color who have to be part of the mix here.”

But overall Love, Death & Robots remains a rare treat for science fiction fans. Humor writer Tom gerencer hopes future seasons will adapt stories from talented authors such as Robert sheckley. “Please keep up the good work,” Gerencer says. “I love it. I’m so excited that there is something like that out there, that it exists.

Listen to the full interview with Zach Chapman, Erin Lindsey and Tom Gerencer in episode 469 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above). And check out some highlights from the discussion below.

Erin Lindsey on Diversity:

“For me – and I think for a lot of people -[the problem with Season 1] wasn’t breasts per se, or sex per se, or violence per se. It was about sexual violence, gratuitous sex, adolescent male gaze and everything in between, and there is an important distinction between these. And kudos to them – I hope it’s not a coincidence – for taking that into account and really showing with Season 2 that you don’t have to do this. But on the other hand then having eight episodes that are all written by dudes – and if I’m not mistaken, all white dudes – it seems to me that goes beyond being deaf and almost sounds like a major deliberate. I do not know. Maybe I’m overreacting, but I don’t think you can make this mistake twice and not know it.

Erin Lindsey on “The cage of life”:

“I think they did a really good job with it. I was a bit overwhelmed by the design of the robot for two reasons. First, I didn’t really see how this design could be useful from a maintenance standpoint, and second, as brilliant as the solution is – where he finds out that what triggers targeting is movement, and so he uses his flashlight to create movement – what it basically does is turn the laser pointer, where you play with your cat, against the wall. And the fact that the robot has a pretty feline design, I seriously expected that [episode] to get into absurd humor at the end, where he says, “Whee, I’m playing with my robot cat.” And that kinda tore me away from the atmosphere.

Tom Gerencer on “Snow in the desert”:

“In the opening scene [Snow] goes to that kind of seedy pawnshop-type alien character to buy his “stuff”, and you get the idea that it’s some kind of drug or it’s something he needs, and then he s’ turns out to be strawberries, and I thought was really cool. I like the whole Mad Max atmosphere, I love the character. Just something about a character – and okay, he’s regenerating, so it’s not that hard for him, but something about a character losing a hand and getting rid of it, that is. is really cool for me. There was a great moment when there was a shooting star that passed. So many good times in this one.

David Barr Kirtley on “Pop squad”:

“I felt it was right Blade runner with children instead of replicants, and it has the same aesthetic as Blade runner, which gave me the impression “I have already seen Blade runner. I don’t know if I really need to watch this. This is also the standard dystopian story, as in Fahrenheit 451, where you have the dystopia agent realizing that what he’s doing is wrong and joining the resistance, so it was very predictable to me. … Then I read the news, and the news worked really well for me. For me it’s another one where I think if it was 20 or 25 minutes it would have been great, but it was just too rushed.


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Calgary writer Mike Thorn finds horror inside collection of sub-genre short stories https://intrepidmouse.com/calgary-writer-mike-thorn-finds-horror-inside-collection-of-sub-genre-short-stories/ https://intrepidmouse.com/calgary-writer-mike-thorn-finds-horror-inside-collection-of-sub-genre-short-stories/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 19:46:06 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/calgary-writer-mike-thorn-finds-horror-inside-collection-of-sub-genre-short-stories/ Breadcrumb Links Books Author of the article: Eric Volmers Release date : June 03, 2021 • 13 minutes ago • 4 minutes to read • Join the conversation Calgary author Mike Thorn. Photo by Anita Jeanine. Photo by Anita Tarnowski /jpg The opinions and recommendations are impartial and the products are selected independently. Postmedia may […]]]>


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In the introduction to Calgary writer Mike Thorn’s short story collection Darkest Hours: Expanded Edition, American horror lover Sadie Hartmann offers a list of the intricate subgenres found inside.

Hartmann, who calls herself Mother Horror, has found traces of everything from “gross body horror” to “satirical black comedy”, “slasher”, “urban legends” and even “satanic panic” from the 1980s in Thorn’s work.

This can perhaps be attributed to Thorn’s unique blend of academic interests and superfan tendencies when it comes to his appreciation of the genre. It started as a 12-year-old who spent a long period of school detention consuming Stephen King’s 1983 classic Pet Sematary rather than his assigned readings. He then moved on to more scholarly pursuits which included writing a thesis on John Carpenter’s 1987 film Prince of Darkness.

But Thorn admits that he thought exploring the myriad ways the horror genre has divided would be a difficult writing exercise for a college-educated creative writing student.

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“As for the Darkest Hours, it was a time when I was really determined to write serious fiction,” she says. “So I think there was a certain degree of awareness in thinking, ‘I’d like to write my version of a slasher story. I would like to write my version of an urban legend. I wish I had my version of a dark, realistic tale. Things like that. It was quite conscious at the time. After writing Darkest Hours, I feel like I’ve covered just about every subgenre in the book.

It may seem a bit overwhelming and academic. But Thorn’s premeditated desire to delve into various horror silos is really just one way the high-profile stories in Darkest Hours were born. As a creative writing major who is about to travel to New Brunswick for his PhD, there is certainly a smart side to his modus operandi. But it was also his experiences in higher education, particularly his pursuit of a master’s degree at the University of Calgary, that indirectly led to a deeper, darker, and more unconscious conduct in his writing.

“There is a common thread throughout the book involving the fear and anxiety that accompany academic environments,” he says. “But, also, a lot of the literature and theories that I was reading at the time, I think, bleed into the stories in different ways.”

How exactly all of this bleeds into Thorn’s work is probably a complex question. For horror fans, it’s safe to say that what matters is Thorn’s mastery of tone and genre and the deep throaty horror that can be found in a number of stories. Hair, for example, is a crude story about a young man named Theodore who becomes obsessed with consuming his and other people’s locks. But, as we learn from Thorn’s author’s notes, he was also influenced by the writer’s love for the grandfather of all obsessive tales, Moby Dick by Herman Melville.

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Satanic Panic stems from Thorn’s work on his dissertation on Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness, but also from his fascination with a particular variety of Christian films in the 1980s and 1990s that attempted to expose the “Satanic Web” supposed to run in full swing. sight and lead America astray.

In fact, part of the fun of reading Darkest Hours is discovering all of the academic and not-so-academic influences that inform the stories, which Thorn dutifully lists in the author’s notes after each story. The first short story he sold, Long Man, was inspired by both Gregg Araki’s 2004 queer movie classic on coming of age, Mysterious Skin, and Cher’s anthemic song, Believe , which the writer said was inexplicably repeating itself in his head when he wrote the story. . When discussing Economics Nowadays, a story fueled by dark humor, Thorn cites everything from Eli Roth’s torture porn films to unscrupulous literature such as The World According to Garp by John Irving and White. Teeth by Zadie Smith.

Whatever the combination of influences, they have guided Thorn through an extremely prolific period. Darkest Hours, which is an expanded version of a collection he released in 2017, will be released on June 11. Shelter of the Damned, a novel about a teenager’s discovery of a mysterious and sensitive cabin in a suburban field that unleashes violence and rage, was released in February. A new collection of short stories, Peel Back and See, will be released on October 29.

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Some of the anxiety at the heart of the Darkest Hours stories stems from a sort of impostor syndrome that Thorn says he feels in some academic circles, which he attributes to his interest in a genre as opposed to more literary fiction. traditional. It’s a feeling that has dissipated over the years, he says.

“I think I’ve come to terms with those feelings now,” he says.

Part of this probably stems from the fact that academic studies are taking genre fiction more and more seriously.

“There also seems to be a resurgence of interest in horror and science fiction,” he says. “I took a cyberpunk-fiction seminar during my masters degree and in my opinion it was one of the most complex and stimulating fictions you can wrestle with. These boundaries are starting to dissolve a bit and people are starting to take genre fiction seriously and evaluate a lot of the ideas in it.

“For me,” he adds, “we live in circumstances that are on the whole horrendous. Horror fiction seems to be one of the most intuitive ways to explore this reality we live in.

Darkest Hours: Expanded Edition will be released on June 11 on JournalStone Publishing.

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College class teams with a national project to publish a book https://intrepidmouse.com/college-class-teams-with-a-national-project-to-publish-a-book/ https://intrepidmouse.com/college-class-teams-with-a-national-project-to-publish-a-book/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 22:20:07 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/college-class-teams-with-a-national-project-to-publish-a-book/ GREENDALE, WI – A Grade 8 social studies class in Greendale, led by teacher Erin McCarthy, publishes 63-page book on their American identity, pandemic education and more, according to a press release . The book is woven from dozens of individual student short stories on various topics. Many have focused on their learning experiences during […]]]>


GREENDALE, WI – A Grade 8 social studies class in Greendale, led by teacher Erin McCarthy, publishes 63-page book on their American identity, pandemic education and more, according to a press release .

The book is woven from dozens of individual student short stories on various topics. Many have focused on their learning experiences during the pandemic, but others focus on family challenges, losses and transitions, according to a spokesperson for Greendale Schools.

The class teamed up with the whole country We are america book publication project. The project was founded by a class at Lowell High School in Massachusetts in 2019. These high school students first sought to define what they thought it meant to be an American.. The WAA project has since spread to classrooms across America, including Ms. McCarthy’s in Greendale.

Much like the original high school class, the project led Greendale students through a process where they first learned about American identity. They then looked for connections between their own history and the larger history of American identity. Subsequently, they wrote poems about how they connect, as individuals, to the world around them. These poems provided a basis for the short stories they wrote.

This news will now be released, making the class experience its own time capsule. Stories will also be posted online among other students in the country participating in the project.

Dozens of teachers from all over America have joined the project. Each led the production of a book for their own class. More than 1,500 students across the country participated, according to the project’s website.



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Book Reviews: Dreaming in Quantum and Other Stories by Lynda Clark | Man Hating Psycho by Iphgenia Baal https://intrepidmouse.com/book-reviews-dreaming-in-quantum-and-other-stories-by-lynda-clark-man-hating-psycho-by-iphgenia-baal/ https://intrepidmouse.com/book-reviews-dreaming-in-quantum-and-other-stories-by-lynda-clark-man-hating-psycho-by-iphgenia-baal/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 01:57:07 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/book-reviews-dreaming-in-quantum-and-other-stories-by-lynda-clark-man-hating-psycho-by-iphgenia-baal/ One of the joys of news is being able to read it and then reread it immediately. Sometimes I do this just to relive the experience of the story, and sometimes to chew on an imaginary pencil and ask “How did you do this?” These two collections are the ones where I was flipping through […]]]>


One of the joys of news is being able to read it and then reread it immediately. Sometimes I do this just to relive the experience of the story, and sometimes to chew on an imaginary pencil and ask “How did you do this?” These two collections are the ones where I was flipping through continuously. Lynda Clark’s work is ironic and cerebral; Iphgenia Baal is hot-tempered and visceral. The short story can be more than one thing. The two, in a different way, are “concept albums”, where the same preoccupations, even the same images are repeated. They feel organized rather than just collected, and that’s commendable.

Lynda Clark’s title is well chosen because it combines two kinds of ambiguity. There is the dreamlike realm of dreams alongside the scientific but strange realm of quantum science. The stories reflect this. In the eponymous work, the final proposition is that dreams are a means of accessing the parallel universes of Everett’s multiverse theory. “Ghillie’s Mum” is a gem with the wonderful opening phrase “When he was a baby, Ghillie’s Mum was primarily an orangutan”. It’s almost a callback to the metamorphosis of the Roman poet Ovid with his changing way of exploring what the human being is. Many of the stories here are what I would call “vanity” stories, in that there is more than a hint of Borges to their confusing and speculative nature. So we have a man whose wife becomes transparent, an attempt to clone whiskey and another clone in “Blanks” learning to be their “Original”. (There is also a strange recurrence of dogs).

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But a better comparison than Borges would be contemporary writers such as China Miéville, Robert Shearman, and Andrew Crumey, who succeed in the trick of investing emotion in fake and fake. There is a lingering death in these stories, most horribly in “Dead Men Don’t Count,” which is almost zombie horror, but strays from what you think. Prose is elegantly invisible, as it does not need to draw attention to itself and distract the reader from ideas, although there is use of the second person – the “you”. both intimate and accomplice and distant, almost a signature. It is a remarkable book by a very interesting writer. One story has the line “the labyrinth itself is skeletal” (and yes, there is a minotaur in the story) but that seems to sum up how it puts hard lines and then slyly erases those boundaries. This is an overwhelming collection, and yet the sensitive chords are discreetly stretched.

Dreaming in the Quantum, by Lynda Clark

Iphgenia Baal is a writer whose work has long intrigued me since I read The Hardy Tree, her book on Thomas Hardy, Cemeteries and How London Moves and Escape. This new collection of her fiction, I hope, will make her better known in what passes as “the literary establishment”. If the book has a signature line, it comes in “Married to the Streets” where the protagonist says, wearily, “But who said London was supposed to be friendly?” It works because there’s a nauseous romance in a litany of names just before it. “London Eye, Gherkin, Crossrail, Shard, Westfield, Westfield, Walkie Talkie, Olympic Village, Cheese Grater, Razor, New Spitalfields Market, Taylor Wimpey, British Land, Foxtons… Of course I was having a hard time.” The men in a provocative book called Man Hating Psycho are not the kind of monsters we might recognize, for example, in Bret Easton Ellis’ America Psycho. It is their uselessness rather than their perfidy that stands out most. But Baal is certainly not giving women a free pass. In ‘Pro Life’ she writes: ‘Although many of us are teenage girls, we were decidedly ill-versed in teenage behavior. ”

Unlike Clark, Baal is more experimental in terms of form. It seems important that while his collection begins with a sort of homage to the Grimm brothers, Baal opens with a story – titled “Change :)” – which is built around mobile phone groups. Other stories include Medieval English (or Medieval False), a story titled “Line” where the reflections on the lines (lifeline, bee line, main line and many others) are typographically asymmetrical on the line. page. Additionally, she has a fondness for characters who are only identified by an initial and a dash. There’s a little nod to Iain Sinclair – a character’s new push leaves her waiting for coffee with the great psychogeographer – but there’s a real sense of Sinclair’s influence. As she writes, “It was as if all the bullshit everyone had to put up with over the past three decades was laid bare and what was on display was old London, unchanged, untouched, unmatched, full of crime, a poltergeist on every corner. There is also a character who is definitely not Boris Johnson, despite the conclusions you might jump to.

While stylistically different, these two books explore major issues, from toxic gentrification to unintended consequences of technology, how to demean and how to empower. As such, they both prove that short fiction still has relevance and, more importantly, beauty.

Dreaming in Quantum and Other Stories, by Lynda Clark, Fairlight Books, £ 8.99

Iphgenie Baal

Man Hating Psycho by Iphgenia Baal, Influx Press, £ 9.99

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The Man Who Hates the Psychopath, by Iphgenia Baal



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World Book Day: news | Kochi News https://intrepidmouse.com/world-book-day-news-kochi-news/ https://intrepidmouse.com/world-book-day-news-kochi-news/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 06:44:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/world-book-day-news-kochi-news/ They were born in the age of digital media. The so-called Alpha Generation – those born since 2010 – are experts in manipulation technology and spend their time clicking, scrolling and swiping, having inherited an ever-expanding world of technology. streaming apps and services, they have much less story time compared to previous generations. The age […]]]>


They were born in the age of digital media. The so-called Alpha Generation – those born since 2010 – are experts in manipulation technology and spend their time clicking, scrolling and swiping, having inherited an ever-expanding world of technology. streaming apps and services, they have much less story time compared to previous generations.
The age of smartphones has made children more self-centered, says Sreejith Perumthachan, whose novel “Kunjuvinundoru Katha Parayaan” recently won the Pala KM Mathew Award, instituted by the Kerala State Institute for Children’s Literature.
The benefits of reading go far beyond literacy. In the words of Perumthachan, only stories can prevent the moral decay that awaits children in the future. Perumthachan says that as the planet celebrates World Book Day, kids need to be reminded to come back to stories and develop a deep love of reading.
“The protagonist of my novel is Kunju, a four or five year old boy. The novel shares Kunju’s experience when he stays with his grandparents. The stories they tell him have a strong influence on him, ”he says. Children should be read at the right age. Parents are essential for developing children’s reading. The challenge is not only to make them read, but also to make them appreciate.
“Most of our well-known writers have written for children. G Sankara Kurp, Sugathakumari, Akkitham, to name a few, all wrote for children. Vaikom Muhammad Basheer’s “Manthrikappoocha” has never been called children’s literature, but it’s perfect for a child to read, ”Perumthachan says. A child’s knowledge of folk tales, local festivals, village life, nature, etc. will be very useful to him in the future. “When I say read, I don’t mean read only popular fiction. There is a decline in morality even among children who read such publications. In my opinion, a kid who grows up with a deep love for folklore would learn more values ​​than those who quickly finish big books, ”he says.
Perumthachan says parents should also have the good taste to discover such stories and tell them to their children. For example, take stories like “Mannaamkatta and Kariyila”. Not hearing such stories leaves a void in character development, he says. “Parents should start telling stories to a child when he or she is three or four years old. Besides written stories, we have stories passed down from generation to generation through word of mouth. For example, anthologies like Ashitha’s “365 Kunju Kathakal” can be read to a child, every day for a year. Parents should find such sources, ”he says.
Parents’ interests are also essential. “Not everyone likes stories or storytelling. You have to make a conscious effort to make space and time for the books. If you made that effort to know the stories and tell them to your children, it would teach them great virtues. Knowledge is not enough. A child’s feeling of giving up an elderly person on a crowded bus comes from good stories, not from school education, “says Perumthachan.” I read a story about a boy who said his sound favorite on this planet was the cash machine. ring. We should be able to let them know how trivial something as common as money is. Parents shouldn’t be reduced to human ATMs, ”says Perumthachan.
“With their gadgets, kids stay ‘connected’ and look busy, but the question is, what is the value of this activity? We must not make our children believe that it is normal to be successful professionally in life and not to have values, ”he says. A magician once converted his child into a parrot. He was, however, unable to transform him into a child. The child was hated by parrots because they knew he was not one of them. He was also ignored by humans because he looked like a parrot. The situation for children today is similar to that of the parrot, says Perumthachan.
“In the race for a predefined goal, children forget to look around and see the life around them. Story books would help them get a better perspective on life, ”he says.



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Even Marvel heroes are afraid of Stephen King https://intrepidmouse.com/even-marvel-heroes-are-afraid-of-stephen-king/ https://intrepidmouse.com/even-marvel-heroes-are-afraid-of-stephen-king/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 11:32:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/even-marvel-heroes-are-afraid-of-stephen-king/ The Thing and the Human Torch regularly run into evil supervillains, but even they are terrified of the works of horror legend Stephen King. Warning: contains spoilers for Wonders # 2! Stephen king is the undisputed master of horror whose works are so influential they frighten even Marvel heroes like the Thing and the Human […]]]>


The Thing and the Human Torch regularly run into evil supervillains, but even they are terrified of the works of horror legend Stephen King.

Warning: contains spoilers for Wonders # 2!

Stephen king is the undisputed master of horror whose works are so influential they frighten even Marvel heroes like the Thing and the Human torch. Both members of the Fantastic Four are used to regularly facing villains like Doctor Doom and Galactus, capable of destroying the entire planet. But still, nothing makes their hearts beat like Pennywise the clown.

In addition to writing over 60 novels and 200 short stories, King has a long history with comics. He has spoken in the past about how he was influenced by works such as EC Comics’ 1950s horror tales and how he liked superhero stories like Batman growing up. He also wrote comics like Horror show and Vertigo American vampire. Many works of sound have been adapted into comics, including The stall and The dark tower series, both by Marvel Comics, and the recent adaptation of Sleeping beauties, which he wrote with his son Owen King. Stephen King’s books have sold over 350 million copies and have been adapted into dozens of films, at least some of which exist in the Marvel Universe.

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Related: The Origin Of Werewolves In Marvel Comics

King’s impact on Marvel heroes can be seen in Wonders # 2 by Kurt Busiek, Yildiray Cinar, Richard Isanove and Simon Bowland. Protagonist Kevin Schumer turns invisible and flies around New York City when he sees the Thing and the Human Torch passing by. They discuss film adaptations of King’s work like the recent It films. Johnny Storm accuses Ben Grimm of not liking movies because he’s a coward, but Ben insists he likes books better. “I like zombies and vampire demon clowns to stay on the page where Stevie King put them,Said the Thing. “Where they belong.“He says he likes that while reading they move as fast as he wants, and that movies’ over-reliance on the fear of skipping is.”way too much like work.“Johnny agrees with him on this point, saying he’ll just be sitting there enjoying the movie”– and then pow! Pennywise breaks through the wall and I react like it’s Annihilus. Fry an entire pot of popcorn once.

Wonders 2

While at first it may seem like a stretch that two people who routinely put their lives on the line would be scared off by mere books or movies, it is a testament to the power of King’s imagination. His best works take the ordinary appearance and turn them into something horrible. A loving husband and father are driven mad by isolation and drive his family away; virus wipes out 99 percent of the world’s population, leaving survivors at war with each other; a friendly dog ​​becomes a voracious beast that turns against its owners. Stripped of their most fantastic elements, many of his books would still be unsettling to read, as often the scariest parts revolve around the horrors humans inflict on each other. Few monsters are as terrifying as the sadistic high school students of Carrie or bullies in He. This can be found even in his non-horrific works like The body or Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption. Since monsters, ghosts, werewolves, and Dracula are relatively common in the Marvel Universe, it’s not out of the question that the Fantastic Four could one day come face to face with creatures like Pennywise or the Outsider. Even the malicious live trucks of Maximum overdrive would probably give some heroes a break.

It’s heartwarming that even world-saving superheroes can still be caught off guard by a good fear of jumping. And the fact that The Thing would rather read books than watch movies is a nice change of pace for a character who is often valued more for his muscles than his brain. Considering that King is known for making cameos in movies based on his works (and even in his own novels), it would be cool to see how these characters react to meeting him in person. Or better yet, it would be amazing to see the Thing and the Human torch face some of Stephen kingclassic villains like Pennywise or Randall Flagg. It would be really terrifying.

Next: Horror Comic Deadbox Promises Inventive Terror As Redbox Turns Evil

Rocket Raccoon Knull King in black

Rocket Raccoon has become more powerful than the King in Black




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A comparison without comparison between Hemingway and me https://intrepidmouse.com/a-comparison-without-comparison-between-hemingway-and-me/ https://intrepidmouse.com/a-comparison-without-comparison-between-hemingway-and-me/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 16:02:12 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/a-comparison-without-comparison-between-hemingway-and-me/ In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Dave Hemingway, left, and Richard Filip, right, smear Michael Groover’s birthday cake after they and other Ernest Hemingway lookalikes sang “Happy Birthday “to the famous American author Saturday, July January 20, 2019, in Key West, Florida. Dave Hemingway (not related to the author) won the […]]]>


In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Dave Hemingway, left, and Richard Filip, right, smear Michael Groover’s birthday cake after they and other Ernest Hemingway lookalikes sang “Happy Birthday “to the famous American author Saturday, July January 20, 2019, in Key West, Florida. Dave Hemingway (not related to the author) won the Hemingway Look-Alike 2016 competition, Filip was victorious in 2017 and Groover, the husband of celebrity chef Paula Deen, won in 2018. July 21 marks the 120th birthday of Hemingway, who lived and wrote on the island in the 1930s. Fun was a facet of Key West’s annual Hemingway Days festival which ends Sunday, July 21. (Andy Newman / Florida Keys News Bureau via AP)

The beard I grew during COVID isolation and recent Ken Burns and Lynn Novick documentary series on Ernest Hemingway leads to thinking about the similarities and differences, and how some things trump others.

We all started our professional journeys as myopic journalists writing for our high school newspapers and graduating on the daily schedule.

At 18, he left the Kansas City Star for Europe, where he drove ambulances for the Red Cross in Italy. When I was 19, my first stories were sent to NPR, which was then a new network.

I worked briefly for the Associated Press in Washington, DC. He has written extensively for the North American Newspaper Alliance.

He quickly adopted writing short stories, novels and non-fiction as an eyewitness to war, romance and bullfighting. I slowly moved from broadcast news to marketing technology and public relations.

He wrote bestsellers which turned into movies. I wrote grants that funded social media interviews.

Rich Finlinson and the bicycle he won in a coloring contest in 1962.

He won the Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes. I won a bicycle in a coloring contest and a few journalism scholarships.

He shot big game in Africa. I shot a video on my smartphone.

He forever changed the landscape of writing. I changed the landscape of my backyard.

He married four times, had three sons and 12 grandchildren. I got married once, had three daughters and two sons, and have 17 grandchildren.

We faced the dual demons of anxiety and depression and faced various fluids. He drank and ordered his 38 foot fishing boat. I found heartwarming swim lengths in a 50-meter pool and excessive content on LCD screens. In short, we both enjoyed water polo.

He suffered multiple head injuries as a war correspondent, an outdoorsman and a world traveler. I suffered several minor injuries as a mountain biker and novice triathlete in northern Utah.

He had access to many prescription and borrowed pharmaceuticals. He underwent several cycles of electroconvulsive therapy at the Mayo Clinic. I have followed decades of advice and have access to pharmaceutical and geriatric expertise unknown during his lifetime.

He died of suicide at the age of 61. I lived to write these words on my 67th birthday at the end of May, which coincidentally is Mental Health Awareness Month.

He is a legend. I’m wearing a mainstream hoodie that says, “Grandpa: the man, the myth, the legend.”

I am not Hemingway. It’s not Finlinson. Still, if we meet at a waterhole below, I think our similarities and differences would lead to a nice conversation.

He may not agree.

Rich finlinson, Salt Lake City, is the author of “How to Capture Ideas and Create Compelling Content”. He is associate director of the Utah Education and Telehealth Network and a communications volunteer at SC21: The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis.



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Stephen King and Pablo Larraín on the adaptation of ‘Lisey’s Story’ and Boo’ya Moon https://intrepidmouse.com/stephen-king-and-pablo-larrain-on-the-adaptation-of-liseys-story-and-booya-moon/ https://intrepidmouse.com/stephen-king-and-pablo-larrain-on-the-adaptation-of-liseys-story-and-booya-moon/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 16:45:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/stephen-king-and-pablo-larrain-on-the-adaptation-of-liseys-story-and-booya-moon/ After a career spanning nearly 50 years, Stephen King has written over 65 books (sometimes publishing three in the same calendar year) and over 200 short stories, making him arguably the most prolific author of our time. But when it comes to adaptations of his work, he mostly wanted to leave them (as he puts […]]]>


After a career spanning nearly 50 years, Stephen King has written over 65 books (sometimes publishing three in the same calendar year) and over 200 short stories, making him arguably the most prolific author of our time. But when it comes to adaptations of his work, he mostly wanted to leave them (as he puts it) to “movie people” and “television people” – until just a few years ago, when he captured “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” on FX.

“Tom Rob Smith wrote every episode [of that limited series]», He remembers. “I watched this show and I said, ‘It’s absolutely fantastic and maybe I could do it with’ Lisey’s [Story]. ”’”

‘Lisey’s Story’ is King’s 2006 novel that focuses on the eponymous widow of a prolific author, who must tap into her memories of her love affair and her husband’s tragic past, as well as his special sanctuary ( Boo’ya Moon) to save her mentally ill sister from a state of catatonia and save herself from an overzealous fan determined to get her husband’s papers. Deeply personal to King and his wife, Tabitha King, the story was first written after being hit by a pickup truck in 1999. For this reason, King admits he has said no on several occasions when others asked if they could adapt. the story. But with the right inspiration and the partners of executive producer and director Pablo Larraín and streamer Apple TV Plus, “Lisey’s Story” has grown into an eight-part series that drops on June 4.

For King, who spoke with Variety over the phone ahead of the new show, revisiting the story, which explores themes of grief, family trauma, bloodshed and fanaticism, “was a chance to rewrite what I had done – to go back and looking at it without a lover’s eye but more of an editorial, colder eye, ”he says.

Plus, “I don’t have to worry about cutting things to fit or finishing them so they can access their Priolsec ads,” he laughs. “It’s a long book, but thank God for streaming because you have the chance to tell a story with a little more nuance, a little more texture. It’s totally immersive, working on a show, and if you want to take the time, you want to put all your heart and soul into it.

In doing so, he found things he wanted to change. For example, he reduced the number of sisters the main character (played by Julianne Moore, also an executive producer) has and removed some of the “inner language of marriage.” However, he found that other areas may have held up better than expected a decade and a half later, including the character of Lisey herself and her thoughts on fan culture.

Of the first, King said, “I wanted to see that she had a bit of humor about certain things and I also wanted to show her temper – that she is a woman who can defend herself without being a screaming machine like a woman in. danger in a standard horror movie. There’s a point where she talks to Dooley and she says ‘fuck you’, and there’s a point where the college professor tries to hold her back when she wants to see her sister and instead of just driving around her car, she puts the car in reverse and slams into her car. So there’s a certain amount of anger that comes with grief, I think.

And as for the latter, while social media didn’t exist when King was writing the novel, he had a lot of inspiration for characters who would take their idolatry of Lisey’s author husband Scott (Clive) too far. Owen). He quotes the man who broke into his house in the early 1990s, “convinced that I had stolen the idea of ​​’misery’ from his aunt’s head and said he had a bomb” ( he didn’t), as did a woman who sued him in the middle of that decade “because she claimed I had flown over her house and stole her thoughts.” Since then, due to the rise of social media and fan sites, he has acknowledged, “The longer you are out there, the more likely someone will decide to shoot you.”

Every King story has an element of a different word and “Lisey’s Story” is no different. In this one, Boo’ya Moon’s fantastic location was another wealthy region that King felt easily translated both visually and for our new age.

Boo’ya Moon is where Scott used to escape as a child, to provide quick and literal healing from the wounds inflicted on him and his brother by their father, but also emotional catharsis. Scott takes Lisey there and shows her some of the special and specific areas, from the healing pool to Sweetheart Hill. Eventually, she must learn to return there on her own.

For the adaptation, these sets were built on “huge, huge sets in the Brooklyn Navy Yard,” says King, but Larraín “didn’t want to have an actor floating around on a green screen,” adds the EP and the director. . Instead, for both the forest decor and the pool, Larraín felt it was important to use real trees and rocks so that “whatever is near the actors is real.” The two places “are the places where the most painful elements can exist, and at the same time, it is a place of healing and beauty. This friction between these elements kind of gave us the tool to really figure out how to do it, ”he says.

“It’s a mysterious place: the sun never really sets on Sweetheart Hill, but it’s always about to set. The moon is always over the pool and it’s a place where it is always dark, ”King adds. “They all read the book. I didn’t ask them to do it because the scripts should be enough. But I went to a pre-production reunion in August, a few months before filming started, and immediately saw that they understood what Boo’ya Moon was supposed to be.

The adaptation also offers a more visual representation of how the characters “go” to Boo’ya Moon, using a water motif that King shares was Larraín’s idea. Even in the forest, Larraín notes, he wanted it to look like “they were under water but without water.” In order to flesh this out further, Larraín also wanted Lisey to have a swimming pool, so when the actual location they found for her house didn’t have one, production dug one out and “put plants around it.” ‘her to give him a Boo’ Ya feel like the moon, ‘King remembers. “It was great, but [the owner] said she didn’t want it when we were done so the pool is no longer there.

Larraín admits that it took him a while to fully understand, let alone believe, the fantastic elements of the series, however. “In that regard, I was a bit like Lisey,” he laughs. But he found an unexpected commonality between Lisey’s story and that of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, whose story of grief and widowhood he recounted in the 2016 film “Jackie.”

“When we did ‘Jackie’ I learned that if you lead with a structure that is going to travel through her memory to different places and times in her life, what is very resonant is having a person. very ingrained – to understand where is she right now and where is she going. If you understand that, you can play, ”he explains.

To ensure that the audience for “Lisey’s Story” would be traveling with her new principal lady, Larraín worked with “wide angles but close to her so you could breathe and go through the process with her, but in at the same time you are able to experience the environment. “

King adds: “One of the things Pablo did that I thought was great was he had these clamshell boards marked Xs – X9, X10, X11 – and they were pretty much MOS close-ups of Julianne in the role of Lisey in various outfits. When you see it cut together, what you see is that it comes back every time, so you hit the base in the present. You go back and forth at different times, but you always know where you are. It’s the difference between what I do with words and with the eye of a very good director like Pablo.

King also credits Larraín with having a keen eye for the violence to be shown in a story that features the ‘brutality’ in Scott’s childhood, as well as the cutting behavior in Lisey Amanda’s (Joan Allen) sister today. ‘hui and in a gruesome scene when Scott fan Jim Dooley (Dane DeHaan) attacks Lisey in her own house.

“You have to tell the story. You have to be brave, and bravery always trumps political correctness or being too careful, but you never really see anything. It’s kind of like the shower scene in “Psycho” where your mind sees the knife going down but you never really see it. What you don’t want to do is let the effects, the sets, all the wonderful things that can be done with cinema today, wash over history, ”King says.

When King first published “Lisey’s Story” he mentioned anecdotally that his wife was not thrilled, which he notes because “it struck us a bit.” So many years later, he admits he didn’t show her the scripts while he was working on them, although she has seen cuts of the finished episodes now. But Larraín had Tabitha King in mind for much of the process.

“This show is kind of a testament to the relevance of Tabitha King in the life of Stephen King,” he says, telegraphed through “how relevant Lisey’s character is.” [is] in the work of Scott Landon. When he’s about to leave this planet, he needs her. This is also the subject of the series. And when I understood that [and understood] the meaning of someone who has been doing this for 50 years and who has shaped our culture, what it means to him, I wanted to honor him.



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Tales of a teenager at war – Muncie Journal https://intrepidmouse.com/tales-of-a-teenager-at-war-muncie-journal/ https://intrepidmouse.com/tales-of-a-teenager-at-war-muncie-journal/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 09:11:04 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/tales-of-a-teenager-at-war-muncie-journal/ By John Carlson – Dick Courtney was a man of great stature, not only physically, but also measured by kindness, kindness and humor. It is a rare combination. I met Courtney years ago, following the publication of her book “Normandy in the Ardennes: An American Infantry GI in Europe During World War II”. Being a […]]]>


By John Carlson –

Dick Courtney was a man of great stature, not only physically, but also measured by kindness, kindness and humor.

It is a rare combination.

I met Courtney years ago, following the publication of her book “Normandy in the Ardennes: An American Infantry GI in Europe During World War II”.

Being a guy who sometimes hangs out with writers, I had met a few war veterans of the greatest generation here who had also written war memoirs. There was John F. Ireland, whose beautiful book was called “My Story”. There was also my friend and former newspaper colleague Dick Stodghill, a writer with a large number of columns and published mystery short stories, both in pulps and hardcover books, to his credit. He wrote “Normandy 1944: the war of a young rifleman”.

But while Courtney had some literary leanings, he was seventy before he went through the grueling process of publishing his memoirs, which were published by Southern Illinois University Press in 1997. At best, it had been a long shot for success, publishers do not necessarily rush to publish old soldiers’ books.

Danged if he didn’t, however.

Upon meeting Courtney, a native of Pennsylvania who eventually founded the General Vending Service of Muncie, I enjoyed a number of encounters with him and his lovely wife, Connie. Key to those reunions, besides the laughs, was his story of spending over two hundred days as a 19-year-old kid wearing a .45 Colt and a bazooka, risking his life to knock out Nazi tanks.

Which conjures up more of Courtney’s attributes: courage, bravery, cojones… you name it.

Crossed by truck from Cherbourg, Courtney remembers seeing the ravages of war, as seen in the pages of Life magazine. “… Only this time it was real. We all pointed out the third floor tub that protruded into the air on its own, supported by the drain pipes since the lower two floors were all rubble in the cellar.

Soon would come the days, weeks and months spent in stiff uniforms of dirt, sweat, dust and shit, GI’s heartfelt wish for a hot shower as unrealistic as wishing for a million dollars.

From another sight, he recalled: “All around us … there were destroyed German tanks, mortars, dead horses and cattle and a strange atmosphere of fog rising which made it seem like the moon landscape. Speaking of cattle, Courtney recalled that the IG cut steaks from the corpses of dead cows. No one knew when the animals were killed, he said, but “The steak was better than the C rations, so we ate them.”

There were also, of course, an appalling number of dead soldiers. At one point, his unit found a squad of six Germans, their faces blackened and sprawled over their backs, dead. “The war seemed real now as we looked at their faces,” Courtney wrote. “They were all about eighteen …”

As bad as it may be, the deaths of fellow GIs have been much more difficult.

He remembers crawling out of a fox hole he dug when an American tank rolled up and quickly exploded. “We had slept in a minefield and we didn’t even know it!”

Some of his tragic tales were macabre irony. Courtney wrote about taking cover in a farmhouse outside which an American Sherman tank was hit. Climbing to the top, the GIs quickly pulled the tank’s lone survivor out of the turret, transported him to the kitchen, and cut off a foot and ankle that hung from a single chain of flesh. Then the injured soldier asked Courtney if he would come back for a bag he had attached to the turret of his tank.

“I said, ‘Dude, you don’t know what you’re asking.'”

“He said, ‘Please, Mac, this is important to me.'”

Ignoring the advice of her own buddies, Courtney rushed over to the tank, grabbing the bag shortly before the armored vehicle exploded. Handing the bag over to the injured tank crew member, Courtney told the guy he was almost killed, and said he hoped what was inside that bag was important.

“Yeah it was,” replied the kid who had just lost his footing. “I had my last pair of dry socks in there.”

There was a time in the town of Eschdorf where Courtney walked into a wooden shed, just to see what was inside, and found dozens of frozen GIs, stacked like firewood.

“I quietly closed the hangar door,” he said.

In addition to fierce fighting, looting was not lacking along the way. The GIs saw it as a reward, giving the Germans a taste of what they had imposed on the ravaged European continent. During this time, they came into contact with German civilians more and more often.

Courtney wrote how in Shleusingen he and his comrades freed a pen of French slaves and then took them to the Gasthaus for beers. The portly bartender at the tavern started to sulk when they made him serve the French, and when the barrel ran dry he pretended he had none left. “Larry Choiniere and I drew our .45s and shouted, ‘Bringen mehr beer! ‘(bring more beer)…’

The result?

“… Fatso got the message.”

Yet the brutality of the war has not abated. With her end near, Courtney was part of a troop movement catching up with German soldiers marshalling thousands of prisoners to the east. When they reached them, these countless prisoners in blue and white striped concentration camp uniforms were lying strafed on the ground.

“It was a sickening sight,” Courtney wrote.

As the fighting progressed, the jaded GIs wondered how their war slogans had changed since they had been drafted or enlisted. What had been “the victory in ’43!” turned into “Win the war in 44!” Now the best they could do was “stay alive in 45!” But the day came when they drove on the bank of the Danube.

“Finally,” Courtney recalls, “we had no more German lands to conquer.”

A longtime Catholic, he found that the war had deeply affected him religiously, strengthening his faith. He recalled how the words of a missal read at a mass on the battlefield struck a chord: “It struck me then! This is for real! ‘It’s my body! This is my blood! “

Later, with the Allied victory, Courtney and her comrades found themselves in Czechoslovakia, with the serenade of displaced Polish women carrying flowers and singing the Polish national anthem to them. The GIs clapped and applauded, then the Poles motioned for the men to sing the US national anthem for them.

“We all looked at each other,” Courtney recalls. “Does anyone know the words of the Star Spangled Banner?”

None of these GIs, the ultimate American patriots, did.

“OK. Let’s sing ‘God Bless America’,” Courtney said. “They won’t know the difference. That’s what we did, with great enthusiasm. The women had tears of joy in them. eyes, and soon us too.

Which reminds us that Monday is Memorial Day, a great time for fun and picnics, but also the most appropriate day to remember all the Americans who have served, especially those who died fighting. for our freedom.

As for my boyfriend Dick Courtney, he passed away at the age of 83 in 2009, joining this silent line of heroes from Boston and Lexington to Iraq and Afghanistan, starting American history.


John’s Weekly Columns are sponsored by Beasley & Gilkison, Muncie’s trusted lawyers for over 120 years.

About Beasley & Gilkison

We listen, analyze your particular situation and prepare an action plan that best suits your needs. Contact one of our attorneys to schedule a consultation, or for more information call 765-289-0661 or visit our Facebook page or website at beasleylaw.com.


Former columnist and longtime columnist for The Star Press in Muncie, Indiana, John Carlson is a storyteller who relentlessly appreciates the wonderful people of east central Indiana and the stories of their lives, whether funny, poignant. inspiring or all three. . John’s columns appear on MuncieJournal.com every Friday.



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Dessa remains busy even as pandemic changes approach to work https://intrepidmouse.com/dessa-remains-busy-even-as-pandemic-changes-approach-to-work/ https://intrepidmouse.com/dessa-remains-busy-even-as-pandemic-changes-approach-to-work/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 15:06:07 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/dessa-remains-busy-even-as-pandemic-changes-approach-to-work/ Sitting atop a building in southern Minneapolis, Dessa admits the start of the pandemic has been difficult. “You know, curled up under the blanket trying to figure out what our new life would be like,” she said. For performers accustomed to rehearsals, tour vans, and live concerts, pandemic life didn’t look like much. But after […]]]>


Sitting atop a building in southern Minneapolis, Dessa admits the start of the pandemic has been difficult.

“You know, curled up under the blanket trying to figure out what our new life would be like,” she said.

For performers accustomed to rehearsals, tour vans, and live concerts, pandemic life didn’t look like much. But after a while, Dessa started looking for alternatives.

“I felt ready to release new music, and I thought that because we’re in this new environment, where touring isn’t possible, there really was no reason to join the touring cycle of” time before, “” she said. “You know where you’re working on a bunch of songs, you put them out there and then you walk around promoting.”

“So I decided to do just one series instead.”

She named it the series “Ides” because she releases a song on the 15th of each month. This one called “Terry Gross” was released in April.

“Since I was a small predator
Mom is like, don’t get ahead of her
I was looking for something better than the regular
And I knew there was candy at the checkout
So not about to settle for vegetables.
Full of growth, I still have a sweet tooth
always try to climb every wall i can see you
take your wichoo influences,
everywhere you go.
Mine were Carmen Sandiego
Lauryn Hill and Terry Gross. “

She says that as she wrote she began to recognize that during the pandemic, isolated listeners who bounced off playlists on their devices would approach music differently and have different needs. Like shortened song intros.

Instead of producing a bunch of songs that could become a touring base album, Dessa created the “Ides” series, where she releases a single on the 15th of each month. Part of that was giving fans something to look forward to – but also keeping her focused on making new music.

Courtesy of Dessa

“You get to the meat of music right away because you can’t afford to mess around – for fear of being skipped,” she said. “So like looking at how the format informs the content itself.”

Dessa is known for her hard-hitting, spitfire lyrics, and she develops them by hitting the pavement, sometimes for hours on end.

“Yeah, I put a lot of miles on those boots, coming out with those lyrics,” she said.

Every now and then she takes inspiration from something she’s been walking on, but a lot of it is playing with words, cadence, and an idea or challenge. For years she had wondered about writing a song that was entirely without verbs.

Like a movie where you only see pictures, she said to herself. “So maybe there is like a lit cigarette in an ashtray. You know what I mean? And then the ice cream melts in a glass and you are creating this kind of world and story without see the action firsthand? I like it. ”

The result of these particular thoughts is the song “Talking Business” by May “Ides”.

Champagne
Fake name
Number on a napkin
Please check
Room key
No more coke for the captain
Lipstick on the filter
Disconnection on the door
Seven hours before the nightly turndown service
On the second floor”

Dessa says the songs “Ides” might appear as an album at some point, but she has other projects going on as well.

She jumped at the chance to do a science podcast for the BBC World Service. The first season of “Deeply Human” ends. She says it allowed her to delve into questions such as: Why do we experience déjà vu? And why do we think it is necessary to tell everyone about it?

A woman poses for a photo.

Writer, performer and podcaster Dessa wraps up the first season of ‘Deeply Human’, a science podcast for the BBC World Service and APM.

Courtesy of Dessa | Photo by Jessy Gonzalez

“How do small children learn to lie and why do many psychologists consider this to be a really important stage in their development?” is another theme, she says.

And then there’s the show about menopause and society’s misunderstanding.

“It’s a really big deal for a lot of people, and we’ve just got a few silly hot flash sitcom jokes. It’s not enough,” she said. “And also, dang, how come I don’t know what I’m for? It wasn’t healthy [class] that I remember. “

In addition to podcasting, Dessa has made a foray into the world of radio drama (watch for an announcement on this) and also got some news accepted for publication.

From now on, Dessa wonders about the return to normal. She acknowledges the company’s enthusiasm about removing COVID-19 restrictions, but after a year of pandemic conditioning. she also sees an almost Pavlovian fear. Maybe it’s a podcast for the second series.

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