Children’s Book – Intrepid Mouse http://intrepidmouse.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:58:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://intrepidmouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Children’s Book – Intrepid Mouse http://intrepidmouse.com/ 32 32 Netflix’s ‘Sweet Tooth’ is a bold but warm take on the unpleasant surprises of a post-pandemic world https://intrepidmouse.com/netflixs-sweet-tooth-is-a-bold-but-warm-take-on-the-unpleasant-surprises-of-a-post-pandemic-world/ https://intrepidmouse.com/netflixs-sweet-tooth-is-a-bold-but-warm-take-on-the-unpleasant-surprises-of-a-post-pandemic-world/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 17:43:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/netflixs-sweet-tooth-is-a-bold-but-warm-take-on-the-unpleasant-surprises-of-a-post-pandemic-world/ At the risk of stating the obvious, post-apocalypse stories tend to be depressing. Children, however, are immune to the sleeping pills of longing; they’ll only be nostalgic for the world as it is now or maybe as it was a minute ago, whether or not adults think it’s horrible and remember better times. Their needs […]]]>


At the risk of stating the obvious, post-apocalypse stories tend to be depressing. Children, however, are immune to the sleeping pills of longing; they’ll only be nostalgic for the world as it is now or maybe as it was a minute ago, whether or not adults think it’s horrible and remember better times. Their needs are immediate and above all physical.

This is one of the reasons why the tone of “Sweet Tooth” balances on the edge of a knife; the title refers to its 10-year-old protagonist – Gus, played by Christian Convery – the love of candy, which he shares with almost every little kid. But this love is what helps the so-called normal people who fear him (or want to imprison him, or see him dead) to recognize his obvious humanity.

By the way, Gus is looking for his mother; the first few times he sees a grown woman, no matter how she reacts to him, he asks her if she knows her, as if all moms are in a big moms club. (The performance of Convery is an embarrassment for the riches of little children.)

Jeff Lemire’s “Sweet Tooth” comic book series, from which the Netflix series is adapted, is a beautiful, chilling take on the post-apocalypse – austere, clever and at times brutal – and from it, the creator of the Jim Mickle series has designed a warm and colorful melodrama. about a strange little boy and his ad hoc family living after the end of civilization. It retains a lot of bold ideas from the comics, but bridges the gap between comic book and movie with jokes and sweet character work.

Series creator Jim Mickle has crafted a warm and colorful melodrama about a strange little boy and his ad hoc family living after the end of civilization.

Gus has stag ears and antlers and lives isolated in the woods with his father (Will Forte) at the start of the show, but soon finds himself learning about the troubled world outside, which has collapsed on himself after a global pandemic led to both a panic and a roundup of all children with animal characteristics like Gus’s.

His guide to the outside world is Tommy Jepperd (the fantastic Nonso Anozie), a former footballer with a dark past. (Lemire previously said that an old Punisher story by “The Boys” writer Garth Ennis inspired the thin, grizzled, white, and Clint-Eastwoody look of the Jepperd comic book; the cast of a bulky black actor with solid comedic chops in the series changes and expands the scope of the story.) The fact that Gus bounces around Jepperd’s sinister Punisher-style antihero as the couple roam the countryside between Yellowstone and the border of the Colorado sometimes makes Jepperd a little ridiculously ridiculous; when it comes to the show’s super-tense action scenes, that also makes it look huge.

The show finds plenty of new ways to surprise an audience that has probably seen too many doomsday shows by this point. Many of his best moments come when a heroic character has a bold plan that seems to work for sure… and then dramatically fails to make it happen. In others, the characters who die in the first few episodes meet cute characters, flirt, and experience the best parts of their lives in flashbacks that we see. “Sweet Tooth” always threatens to get either too dark or too sweet, but somehow it never strays too far back and forth.

Lemire’s comic was horribly premonitory about a lot of things: his cover paint for number 7 depicts helpless children of the animal-child subclass of the series behind a chain-link fence, their fingers intertwined in them. son. Today, that could practically be a topical photo of the increasingly cruel immigrant child detention practices in the United States; several scenes from the comic take place in what could just as easily be one of ICE’s “baby prisons”.

Lemire’s most provocative idea, held by Mickle, is that blurring the line between humans and animals might force us to consider how we treat animals as well as how we treat people.

Fortunately, Mickle tends to set dark settings on the show and then use them as joke scenes; at one point, a character about to be killed by their neighbors calls them “savages with better hairstyles” and everyone glances at another of them, who certainly has the most beautiful haircut in the crowd.

But more interestingly, Mickle and his team weave the stories of the main characters in a way that seems destined to elicit sympathy for all but the worst of them. Mickle, it turns out sometimes, has already encouraged people before he saw them do some really bad things.

Lemire’s most provocative idea, held by Mickle, is that blurring the line between humans and animals might force us to consider how we treat animals as well as how we treat people. The children of “Sweet Tooth” may hold the key to curing the disease that has killed millions and millions – so they are kidnapped into loving, experienced and vivified homes.

Some of these children with animal qualities, we learn, look more like animals than our protagonist – often unable to speak humanly. This lack of human capacity is then used to justify their state’s actions against them, as if their right to live a free and happy life is being called into question due to their deviations from the perceived human standard.

Like the X-Men stories, “Sweet Tooth” can be read as the story of any oppressed class, but its emphasis on how good people justify cruelty by measuring moral worth by perceived intelligence or normativity is both timeless and, perhaps unfortunately, timely.

“When things fall apart, we find out who we really are,” the narrator (James Brolin) observes during season one’s closing cut (one of many consciously cheesy Western-style storytelling). This is true in both good and bad ways, and “Sweet Tooth” often leaves you wondering which way someone is going to jump. I can’t wait to learn more.



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The novel Troubles resonates 25 years later https://intrepidmouse.com/the-novel-troubles-resonates-25-years-later/ https://intrepidmouse.com/the-novel-troubles-resonates-25-years-later/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 05:36:52 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/the-novel-troubles-resonates-25-years-later/ Lately I’ve been thinking about Deirdre Madden’s 1996 novel, One by One in the Darkness. Madden wrote it in order to show “what it was like to go through the Troubles.” As fewer and fewer readers remember this moment for themselves, this book will become more and more relevant. In Spring 2017, as an American […]]]>


Lately I’ve been thinking about Deirdre Madden’s 1996 novel, One by One in the Darkness. Madden wrote it in order to show “what it was like to go through the Troubles.” As fewer and fewer readers remember this moment for themselves, this book will become more and more relevant.

In Spring 2017, as an American Fulbright Fellow, I taught an advanced undergraduate seminar at Queen’s University Belfast on Literary Responses to the Peace Process in Northern Ireland. Although I had visited the North often for over a quarter of a century, I was nervous about teaching Northern Irish students on this subject. So I was surprised to find that I knew more about the Troubles of the late 20th century than they did.

Maybe I shouldn’t have been. They were just toddlers when the Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998, and most of their elders didn’t bother discussing the bad days that had come before it. A Belfast without sidewalk cafes and shopping malls was as unimaginable to them as a Belfast with them would have been to me in 1989, when I first visited a city without tourists, left-luggage facilities or trash cans. I tried to describe to these young people what this depressed and depressing city looked like.

Some students believed that the unrest-related violence had been confined to urban ghettos, failing to understand that it could happen anywhere at any time and afflict people who saw themselves apolitical as well as activists on either side. Others imagined that the experience of spending time at a site of armed conflict must be terrifying or exciting, and I struggled to convey the more common mixture of boredom and anxiety.

If I had these conversations today, a contemporary comparison would easily come to mind. The Troubles, I would tell my students, was like the Covid-19 pandemic, but a pandemic that lasted for 30 years.

The people who have died from Covid-19 and their families and friends are the most obvious victims of the pandemic, but far from the only ones. More accurate recording of losses should also take into account those who fell ill and recovered (or not); medical personnel traumatized by the current emergency; the elderly isolated from their relatives; people working in businesses and professions devastated both by the pandemic and the efforts to contain it; children and adolescents whose education has been disrupted by school closures; and those who have been afraid since the start of the pandemic to venture far from home or visit places where crowds congregate.

Economically, culturally, physically and psychologically, the current health crisis has cast a shadow over entire societies, resulting in ever greater political polarization. It is no exaggeration to say that all of us, including coronavirus deniers, have been harmed in one way or another by the pandemic. How long, I wonder, will the stress of this particular time continue to be felt after the virus is removed?

Novelist Deirdre Madden had a similar question in mind while working on One by One in the Darkness. First published 25 years ago this spring, it was conceived in the run-up to another anniversary in 1994: 25 years after sectarian riots in Belfast and Derry sparked the deployment of British troops to Northern Ireland. North. In Madden’s recollection of the time she wrote the book, it seemed that the Troubles had lasted forever and would continue indefinitely.

The novel’s current action takes place a few months before the IRA’s provisional ceasefire in August 1994, but the characters don’t know it. What they do know is that “well over three thousand people” have been killed in the conflict as of this date, “and each of them had parents or husbands and wives and children whose lives had been wiped out ”. This category of victims includes the family at the center of the novel, consisting of a mother and three adult daughters, whose husband and father were murdered by loyalist gunmen in a mistaken identity case.

One by One in the Darkness is generally described as the story of a family that suffered tragic loss. If this is true, it also portrays the representative experience of a family, whose relationship to the Troubles was typical rather than exceptional until the night of October 1991 when its patriarch was killed. Like any text that I know, the novel expresses the worldly reality of those years.

The three sisters are young children when conflict breaks out, and Madden documents how slowly they are deprived of their innocence as divisions in Northern Irish society begin to manifest in horrific acts of violence. Odd-numbered chapters describing the reactions of various family members in 1994 to the news that the younger sister is expecting an out-of-wedlock baby alternate in the book with chapters illustrating the local community’s responses to the volatile political situation of the late 1980s. 1960s.

These flashback chapters present a moving history of the Troubles from a rural, Catholic and nationalist perspective. Along with descriptions of historically significant events are stories illustrating their local effects. Each successive even chapter advances the historical narrative chronologically to the present of the novel. Cumulatively, they illustrate how the Troubles gradually encroached on daily life, and how, despite themselves, this life continued.

This historical tale is familiar to any Catholic who grew up in Northern Ireland outside the urban centers of Derry and Belfast in the 1960s and 1970s. Children who experience the events, however, acquire much of their awareness of the action that takes place through adult conversations heard and imperfectly understood. Because the adults in their lives are newly obsessed with listening to and discussing the news, “The sisters quickly learned not to interrupt these discussions, nor to make noise while the news was on the radio or on the phone. television ”. Their own lives, however, revolve even more around “a spell test at school, or a visit to the dentist, or the prospect of going to the movies in Magherafelt or Ballymena”.

For the older sister, 13 at the time, the line between innocence and a terrible deal was crossed shortly after Bloody Friday, July 21, 1972, when the IRA detonated at least 20 bombs across Belfast in just over an hour, killing 11 people, most of whom were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time and injuring 130 others. Late at night, she hears her father come downstairs and finds him smoking alone in the kitchen. He calls her to his side and hugs her tightly:

“What if . . . ?” he said finally, and kissed her harder. “What if . . . ?” but he couldn’t finish what he was trying to say, and she realized he was crying. She knew now, all of a sudden, what he was thinking; and there in the darkness it was as if she had already lost him, as if her loved body had already been violently destroyed. They clung to each other like people rescued from a shipwreck or a burning building; but it was no use, the disaster had already happened. All over the country, people were experiencing the nightmare that she dreaded now more than anything. Who was she to think she deserved to be spared? He led her back to his room and hugged the blankets tightly around her in the bed; he stroked her face and told her he loved her; he told her to sleep. But she acquired a dark knowledge that night that will never leave her.

Knowledge of how quickly lives could be arbitrarily interrupted or wasted lurked behind the backs of all Northern Irish people of adult consciousness during the Troubles – a phenomenon that our own more recent experience may help us understand. a new way.

My QUB students didn’t have this pandemic experience, but they were still viscerally linked to Madden’s novel. It was a favorite dish for students of Protestant descent, who loved to encounter familiar Northern Irish landscapes, expressions and cultural practices with a Catholic perspective they were much less familiar with. The narration of the novel, mainly from the point of view of mature children, made this perspective accessible to them.

Several students commented that the book would also be “educational” for those outside Northern Ireland seeking to understand it better. At a time when Irish teenagers have no personal memories of the turmoil of the past century, I think Deirdre Madden’s One by One in the Darkness should be read in schools on both sides of the border.

Marilynn Richtarik, professor of English at Georgia State University in Atlanta, has published books on the Field Day Theater Company and playwright Stewart Parker. She is currently writing a book on literature and the peace process in Northern Ireland.



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The library launches its summer reading program https://intrepidmouse.com/the-library-launches-its-summer-reading-program/ https://intrepidmouse.com/the-library-launches-its-summer-reading-program/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 06:56:11 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/the-library-launches-its-summer-reading-program/ The children’s room at the library is a colorful place for children to read, play and learn. submitted HANCOCK COUNTY – If the range of prizes offered for actively participating in this year’s Hancock County Public Library Summer Reading Program doesn’t motivate you to pick up a book and read, there is something that doesn’t. […]]]>


HANCOCK COUNTY – If the range of prizes offered for actively participating in this year’s Hancock County Public Library Summer Reading Program doesn’t motivate you to pick up a book and read, there is something that doesn’t. do not go.

“Tails and Tales”, active since June 1, runs through August 1 at both branches of the Hancock County Public Library, offers programs for children, teens and adults.

The library uses an app called Beanstack to track reading progress. The extremely user-friendly website walks you through. By registering, you win an e-ticket. Record your minutes, and the minutes are added to the hours. For every hour you spend reading, you’ll earn another e-ticket. Adults can record minutes spent reading books, graphic novels, magazines, e-books, newspapers, children’s books, or listening to audiobooks.

“You can read the back of the cereal box or the longest novel in the world,” said Cody Flood, library access services manager. “We don’t care what you read, as long as you read.”

And what can you gain? The price packages are mind blowing. No more plastic whistles and bookmarks. Adults can win an “Ultimate Pizza Party” for the winner and nine friends at Carnegie’s, or a $ 50 Indiana State Parks camping pass with ingredients for S’mores; two readers will win Retail Therapy with $ 25 gift cards at Ella June’s, Francis + Fern, Wooden Bear and Greenfield Chocolates; someone will win a gift card valid for four people to enjoy 90 minutes of ax throwing at Ragnarok in Castleton; someone will win a $ 100 gift card and a 60-minute private game session for six people at Hitherto Coffee and Games; and three lucky people will win the Library Super Fan Pack with a camping chair, umbrella, tote, chip clip, license plate cover, pens and pencils, and a Cat’s Meow miniature bookcase.

The prize list is equally diverse and amazing for the team of teens: multiple gift card winners for Amazon, Apple, Hometown Comics, Evolution VR, Legacy Cinema, Old Navy, and a Shauna Marie photography package. The rules are the same: read and save your minutes to win the e-tickets, and after 10 a.m. the teens automatically win a paperback.

And, oh, to be a kid! Gift cards to Dairy Queen, Frosty Boy, Mozzi’s, Legacy Cinema. One lucky winner will win a 68-inch wading pool or family membership to the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Twenty children will win five passes to the Indiana State Fair. Two children will win a bicycle. Are you already registered?

Youth Services Director Cathy Riley eagerly awaits a library full of children. She offers a service called Readers’ Advisory, where she invites children to share with her books that they have already read.

“We have what we call ‘read-alikes’,” Riley said. “When kids are looking for a book to read, we ask them which books or authors they liked to read. This information helps us to suggest read-alikes. Some of the best conversations to have with children are about the books they are passionate about.

But the fun of summer at the library isn’t limited to e-tickets, book reviews and prizes. Cathy Riley, Manager of Youth Services, promises fun weekday programs both outdoors and in the great outdoors.

Every Monday in June a different activity for the kids will take place starting with “Stuntology” on June 7th. Stuntman Sam Bartlett introduces the art of exploring the mysteries of the physical world by playing with everyday objects. Participants can learn them and amaze their friends. On June 14, Rope Warrior David Fisher, who holds the Guinness World Record for a skipping rope performance, will wow audiences with his skipping rope movements. His jump speed has been timed at over 100 mph. On June 21, everyone’s favorite Amazon John will be back with some interesting creatures and unusual facts about the animal world. On June 28, the Tricky Max Imagination Show visits the library with its quirky puppets and fairy tales. All programs will take place both in the main branch and in the libraries of the new Palestine branch. Registration is compulsory.

In addition to programming, the library will continue to resume take-out craft projects in in-person storytelling.

And Flood looks forward to increased library traffic and participation in available programs.

“You should take this and come see what’s going on at the library,” Flood said.



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15 Dane County Students Win University-Sponsored Scholarships Through National Merit Competition | Local education https://intrepidmouse.com/15-dane-county-students-win-university-sponsored-scholarships-through-national-merit-competition-local-education/ https://intrepidmouse.com/15-dane-county-students-win-university-sponsored-scholarships-through-national-merit-competition-local-education/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/15-dane-county-students-win-university-sponsored-scholarships-through-national-merit-competition-local-education/ Fifteen high school students from public and private schools in Dane County have been named recipients of a college-sponsored merit scholarship and will receive between $ 500 and $ 2,000 per year for their college education for up to four years. Five students from Madison School District and one from private school in Madison area, […]]]>


Fifteen high school students from public and private schools in Dane County have been named recipients of a college-sponsored merit scholarship and will receive between $ 500 and $ 2,000 per year for their college education for up to four years.

Five students from Madison School District and one from private school in Madison area, four from Middleton-Cross Plains School District, two from Verona School District, one from private school in Waunakee, one from school district from Oregon and one from the Sun Prairie area school district were named recipients of the college-sponsored merit scholarship.

Class of 2021: Graduation Plans for Dane County School Districts



The students were among 3,100 students from across the country to win the award from a national talent pool of 16,000 finalist students. They will receive scholarships to fund up to four years of undergraduate study at one of 160 higher education institutions. An additional group of academics will be announced in July.

Recipients were selected by a panel of college admissions officers and high school counselors based on the student’s academic record, including the difficulty of the subjects studied and the grades achieved; preliminary results of the SAT and the qualification test for national merit scholarships; contributions and leadership in school and community activities; an essay and a recommendation written by a high school official.

Approximately 7,500 finalists will have achieved the title of “Merit Scholar” and received a total of nearly $ 30 million in college scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Competition by the end of 2021.



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Market trends for children’s and young adult books include https://intrepidmouse.com/market-trends-for-childrens-and-young-adult-books-include/ https://intrepidmouse.com/market-trends-for-childrens-and-young-adult-books-include/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/market-trends-for-childrens-and-young-adult-books-include/ LONDON, Jun 01, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – According to The Business Research Company’s research report on the market for children’s and young adult books, children’s and young adult book companies are increasingly offering books based on popular video games. The growing popularity of video games ensures that books based on popular video game characters help […]]]>


LONDON, Jun 01, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – According to The Business Research Company’s research report on the market for children’s and young adult books, children’s and young adult book companies are increasingly offering books based on popular video games. The growing popularity of video games ensures that books based on popular video game characters help children build interest in reading and telling new stories about their favorite video games. With the release of new games, there is also an opportunity for crossovers and a combination of the book and the video game to create a multi-faceted immersion. For example, popular book companies such as Barnes & Noble and Penguin Books have a range of books based on video games such as Pokémon, Super Mario, Angry Birds, Sonic, Daniel X, and others.

Companies in the young adult and children’s book market are focusing on offering personalized story books to create more engaging content and provide a better experience. Personalized story books are sold online and allow children’s names, addresses and preferences to be inserted into a storybook, and even allow the characters to look like children. These books are loved by children because they are specially designed for them and feature children or their friends and family as heroes in the story. For example, UK-based Bang On Books offers personalized adventure books for children in which they become the main character. It allows customers to choose from several different stories online before personalizing them with the child’s details and photographs.

The Business Research Company report titled Global Children’s and Young Adult Books Market Report 2021: COVID 19 Impact and Recovery to 2030 covers top children’s and young adult book companies, children’s books market shares and young adults by company, manufacturers of children’s and young adult books, children and young adult books market size and forecast of the children and young adult books market. The report also covers the global children’s and young adult books market and its segments.

Request For A sample of the world Books for children and young adults Market Report:

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The size of the global children’s and young adult books market is expected to increase from $ 16.88 billion in 2020 to $ 18.2 billion in 2021 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.8%. The growth is mainly due to companies reorganizing their operations and recovering from the impact of COVID-19, which previously led to restrictive containment measures involving social distancing, remote working and the closure of business activities that have resulted in operational challenges. The market is expected to reach $ 21.95 billion in 2025 at a CAGR of 4.8%.

Asia Pacific is the larger region on the world market for books for children and young adults, 34.4% of the total in 2020. It was followed by North America, Western Europe and then the other regions. In the future, the fastest growing regions in the market for books for children and young adults will be the Middle East and South America, where growth will be at the CAGR of 13.0% and 9.7% respectively during 2020-2025. These will be followed by Africa and Eastern Europe, where the markets are expected to grow at CAGRs of 8.8% and 7.0% respectively.

The global market for children’s and young adult books is concentrated, with a few major players taking control of the market. the top ten competitors on the market composed of 60.98% of the total market in 2020. The major market players are The Penguin Random House, Hachette Livre, Holtzbrinck Publishing Group, HarperCollins Publishers, Scholastic, Phoenix Publishing & Media, Inc., Simon & Schuster, Oxford University Press, McGraw-Hill Education and Bonnier Group.

Global Children’s and Young Adult Books Market Report 2021: COVID 19 Impact and Recovery to 2030 is one of a series of new reports from The Business Research Company that provide market overviews, analyze and forecast the size and market growth for the entire market, segments and geographies, trends, drivers, restraints, revenues, profiles and market shares of major competitors in over 1,000 industry reports, covering over 2,500 market segments and 60 geographic areas. The report also gives an in-depth analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on the market. The reports are backed by 150,000 datasets, in-depth secondary research, and proprietary information from interviews with industry leaders. A team of highly experienced and expert analysts and modelers provide market analysis and forecasting. The reports identify major countries and segments for opportunities and strategies based on market trends and approaches of major competitors.

Here is a list of similar reports from the trade research company:

Global Fiction Book Market Report 2021: Impact and Recovery of COVID-19 through 2030

Global Book Publishers Market Report 2021: Impact and Recovery of COVID-19 through 2030

Global Digital Publishing Market Report 2021: Implications and Growth of COVID-19 to 2030

Want to learn more about The Business Research Company?

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Each faction of the main characters in the book, explained https://intrepidmouse.com/each-faction-of-the-main-characters-in-the-book-explained/ https://intrepidmouse.com/each-faction-of-the-main-characters-in-the-book-explained/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 18:08:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/each-faction-of-the-main-characters-in-the-book-explained/ Dune is an incredibly complicated fictional universe with many complex parts. Here are all of the major factions from the books and the movie explained. Frank Herbert Dune is a groundbreaking sci-fi epic with all manner of superhumans, witchcraft, alien races, corporate entities and political factions set in a vast and complex universe. the Dune […]]]>


Dune is an incredibly complicated fictional universe with many complex parts. Here are all of the major factions from the books and the movie explained.

Frank Herbert Dune is a groundbreaking sci-fi epic with all manner of superhumans, witchcraft, alien races, corporate entities and political factions set in a vast and complex universe. the Dune The series of books has a rich tradition that spans the entirety of a 14-book saga. Denis Villeneuve’s next adaptation, scheduled for October 1, covers the first half of Frank Herbert’s first book. The first trailer presented to the public Dunethe sandworms, the free men, the Harkonnens, the Atreides and the reverend mothers Bene-Gesserit.

Which sets Dune apart from other sci-fi epics of its ilk, it focuses on the human elements and character factions of the universe. Instead of building a futuristic fantasy world on androids, aliens and lasers, Dune illustrates a future rich in psychotropic substances, religious fanaticism, corrupt governments and colonial conquest. In this imagined future, humanity had to survive without a computer, forcing human minds to evolve. At the same time, the expansion of society into vast expanses of space has led to corporate and political structures that closely echo those in the real world.

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Related: The Most Anticipated Movies Of 2021

Dune, like a movie, has the reputation of being notoriously difficult to adapt. The sheer size of the universe and the complexity of its inner workings pose a challenge to anyone unfamiliar with books. Even one of Hollywood’s most legendary and enigmatic directors, David Lynch, struggled to introduce audiences Dune universe. The factions of characters that inhabit Dune are dense. For those who won’t have time to read the book until October, here’s a brief rundown of all the important factions.

The Bene-Gesserit

Rebecca Ferguson in movie Dune

Women rule the world of Dune, and nothing more than the Bene-Gesserit. The Bene-Gesserit is an order of powerful women who seek to control the universe through their complex breeding system. Lady Jessica, played by Rebecca Ferguson in the 2021 film, is a powerful member of the Order and the mother of Timothée Chalamet’s Paul Atreides. They can choose the sex of their children, are skilled in all areas of martial arts, can essentially read minds, and use the power of the “voice” to order others to do whatever they want. They control the lineages of every house in the galaxy and are the architects of the individual religions on every planet.

The Landsraad

Dune Oscar Isaac Timothée Chalamet First Look

Politics is a complex and complex game Dune. The Landsraad is the governing body which represents all the great houses of the Imperium. Houses, similar to Game of thrones, are wealthy, land-owning families who rule the planets across the Galaxy. The Landsraad council meets to discuss intergalactic trade issues and official declarations of conflict. There are three houses which are important for the history of Dune: House Atreides on the planet Arrakis, the protagonists, House Harkonnen, their mortal enemies, and House Corrino, the Imperial Emperor. The Landsraad system is designed to control corruption, but Dune illustrates that human beings always find a way.

The spacing guild

Giant Sandworm in Dune 2020 movie

While the Landsraad controls the earth, the Space Guild and its Guild Navigators control outer space. All trade and transportation between the planets is handled by the corporate entity, which makes the guild as powerful as any of the Houses, the Emperor or the Landsraad. Navigating the galaxy requires a lot of skills that only Guild Navigators have, which gives them exclusive access to light-speed voyages. Their monopoly on commerce, banking and transportation is a pervasive force to be reckoned with across the galaxy.

Mentats, doctors Suk and Sardaukar

Described as “human computers, “Mentats have the ability to evaluate information at superhuman speed and calculate the most beneficial outcome. Thufir Hawat, played by Stephen McKinley Henderson in the upcoming film, is the House Atreides Resident Mentor. House Atreides also employs a Suk Doctor in its ranks in Doctor Yueh, which will be played by Chen Yang. Suk Doctors are highly advanced physicians with a unique conditioning that prevents them from taking human life or betraying those they serve. The Sardaukar are an elite fighting force created and used by the Emperor. The Emperor has his own prison planet, Selusa Secundus, where he creates an army of super soldiers who have never been defeated by any other fighting force in the galaxy. All these factions and many more will be within Denis Villeneuve Dune.

Next: Matrix 4 vs Dune: Which Movie Will Win The 2021 Sci-Fi Movie Battle

  • Dune (2021)Release date: 01 October 2021

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Plane carrying Gwen Lara crashes into lake https://intrepidmouse.com/plane-carrying-gwen-lara-crashes-into-lake/ https://intrepidmouse.com/plane-carrying-gwen-lara-crashes-into-lake/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 20:03:45 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/plane-carrying-gwen-lara-crashes-into-lake/ NASHVILLE, Tennessee – Controversial diet guru and church leader Gwen Lara and her husband, actor Joe Lara, are among seven people believed to have died after a small plane crashed into a Tennessee lake, the authorities said. The Cessna C501 was bound for Palm Beach, Florida when it crashed into Percy Priest Lake about 3 […]]]>




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Padma Lakshmi teaches children to eat healthy https://intrepidmouse.com/padma-lakshmi-teaches-children-to-eat-healthy/ https://intrepidmouse.com/padma-lakshmi-teaches-children-to-eat-healthy/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 14:37:15 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/padma-lakshmi-teaches-children-to-eat-healthy/ Sharing her journey from celebrity chef to first-time children’s author, Padma Lakshmi sat down with Viking Children’s Books Editorial Director Tamar Brazis to discuss the upcoming release of her debut book. ‘images, Tomatoes for Neela (August 31). Their conversation took place Thursday, May 27 from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. ET during the US Book […]]]>


Sharing her journey from celebrity chef to first-time children’s author, Padma Lakshmi sat down with Viking Children’s Books Editorial Director Tamar Brazis to discuss the upcoming release of her debut book. ‘images, Tomatoes for Neela (August 31). Their conversation took place Thursday, May 27 from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. ET during the US Book Show, presented by Weekly editors.

The idea for Lakshmi’s book came to fruition when, to her dismay, Lakshmi’s young daughter requested fresh pomegranates in July. “I was horrified; it’s midsummer and we only eat them when it’s cold, ”she laughs. Realizing that many children may not understand the origin of what they eat, she decided to put a pen on paper.

“I wanted to create a story that teaches my daughter to respect the seasons, about when things change and also where our food comes from,” she told Brazis. Growing up in the United States and India (where she spent her childhood summers), Lakshmi saw this book as an opportunity to take their weekly getaways to the local farmer’s market and create a story that celebrates her Indian heritage, her family and their sharing. love of food.

Plant the seeds

As far back as Lakshmi can remember, she has kept a personal library of cloth-covered notebooks containing recipes that she created with her mother and grandmother in their respective kitchens. “There was a big difference in their cooking styles and I wanted to make sure I saved them,” she said. “I added recipes every time we cooked, so I didn’t forget the nuances of what we created and why we loved it.” When her daughter decided to turn a diary she had received into her own cookbook, Lakshmi realized that she could start a tradition that would bridge the generation gap. “For our loved ones who couldn’t be here, it brought a pantheon into the kitchen,” she added.

In Tomatoes for Neela, the story revolves around the relationship between the mother and the daughter who go to the market and their emotional connection with the grandmother of the girl who lives in India. Lakshmi’s own grandparents were influential in her writing: her grandfather for instilling a love of books and her grandmother as a down-to-earth cook who created memorable meals for a large family on a two-burner stove. Tomatoes also play a prominent role in this book – not only as a ubiquitous ingredient in Indian cuisine, but for their place in Lakshmi’s cultural (and culinary) assimilation; she loves adding a frozen slice of beefsteak tomato to her BLT. In her book, Lakshmi shares easy-to-assemble dishes with young readers, including recipes for tomato sauce and tomato chutney.

Also included are fun facts about tomatoes and a tribute to the farmers who harvest the beloved vegetable – an idea suggested by the book’s illustrator, Juana Martinez-Neal. Lakshmi recognizes the disconnect between the tomato on the dinner table and the hands that picked it up. “This book is an attempt to shorten that distance. These people deserve to be well paid and to benefit from security conditions, ”she said.

While Lakshmi has already established a presence in the cookbook space, she is excited to enter the children’s book market. A longtime reader, she remembers NM Bodecker’s book of absurd poetry, Let’s get married, says the cherry, whose title poem she knows by heart. “The books I have the most connections with are children’s books. If you can influence the growth of a child in this way, your work will be really meaningful, ”she enthused.

Having enjoyed the whole process of watching his first book for young readers come together, Lakshmi hopes that Tomatoes for Neela will not be his last. Her fervent hope is that this book will not only help children become more interested in their food and where it comes from, but ultimately develop a healthy mind and body. “If a child grows up to be someone who is interested in what they eat, you will give them an appreciation for their own nutrition that will replace your presence in their life,” she said.



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Making publishing more inclusive requires leadership https://intrepidmouse.com/making-publishing-more-inclusive-requires-leadership/ https://intrepidmouse.com/making-publishing-more-inclusive-requires-leadership/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 00:18:32 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/making-publishing-more-inclusive-requires-leadership/ Tuesday was the first anniversary of George Floyd’s death, and the importance of the date was raised several times throughout the day on panels at the US Book Show, including an afternoon session on hiring and prioritizing inclusion in your workforce. “It’s a day of solidarity and mourning, but also of responsibility,” said Carrie J. […]]]>


Tuesday was the first anniversary of George Floyd’s death, and the importance of the date was raised several times throughout the day on panels at the US Book Show, including an afternoon session on hiring and prioritizing inclusion in your workforce. “It’s a day of solidarity and mourning, but also of responsibility,” said Carrie J. Bloxson, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Hachette Book Group.

Asked Shelly Romero, associate editor of Scholastic, who served as moderator for the panel, on what has been the biggest obstacle to diversifying the book industry, Blixon emphasized transparency. She argued that leaders should take responsibility for the work by publishing regular reports on key indicators and impact targets. “That’s not to say that there won’t be hard truths and revealing information – some things will work and some efforts won’t – but being transparent about your progress against DNI goals will force learnings and, I think, a thoughtful dialogue along the way for everyone, ”she said. (HBG released its latest report on its diversity efforts earlier this month).

Stacey A. Gordon, author of Unbias: tackling unconscious prejudices at work (Wiley), noted that after Floyd’s murder, many companies, including publishing companies, issued statements in support of Black Lives Matter, but the biggest obstacle to progress has been bringing the leaders to follow up on their statements. “My question is: How many of these statements involved concrete actions?” Gordon asked. “My question is, how many have kept those promises? How many business leaders who issued statements can remember that statement, and if we asked them today, would they know? “

After pointing out that about 85% of the Association of American Literary Agents (AALA) members are white, Agent Ayesha Pande, owner of Ayesha Pande Literary, said she believes two of the deepest barriers to the diversification of the agency’s staff were the biases in favor of hiring exclusively people with elite education and the ubiquity of unpaid internships as a means of training – the latter, she added. , immediately excludes those who cannot give their work. “Another thing is clicking that gives insiders an edge, people who already know each other through their social networks. Those who are not part of these networks find it difficult to access these networks. “

Jason Low, editor of Lee and Low – who published two core diversity surveys, the last of which in January 2020 – said leaders need to “listen differently” because there is a lot of misunderstanding about inequality issues. and under-representation. “It just wasn’t covered in a lot of people’s formal education or since they left school,” he said. This creates a barrier in itself, because “there is going to be a lot of uncomfortable things in your path and leaders are not comfortable being uncomfortable. For real change to take place, “leaders will have to feel uncomfortable.”

Significant changes, although gradual, are underway, but they are slow. Pande – who represents the winner of the National Book Prize Ibram X. Kendi, among others – highlighted the development of the Literary Agents for Change group, a non-profit charitable organization of the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee of the AALA. The group initially offers four paid internships to candidates from under-represented communities. In addition, the organization offered anti-bias training to its members. “We know that’s not a long-term solution – officers should pay interns a living wage or get rid of the internship model all together.” She said the low starting salaries in officers made the profession untenable for many.

Romero said that when it comes to fostering change, the onus of educating colleagues about the lack of inclusion and diversity in the workplace unfairly falls on the small number of BIPOC employees who are already in the labor market. Addressing the problem, she said, should really be up to management. But what can we do?

It starts with leadership “by recognizing the work already done by your BIPOC employees. Make sure you don’t take credit for their work, make sure they aren’t sidelined, ”Gordon said. Bloxson said that while much of the industry is focused on recruiting, the industry must also look at retention, which begins with the employee experience: “It’s also important to understand that everyone in the BIPOC community is unique and you need to be able to individualize these conversations. “

Pande and Gordon both lamented the disappearance of real learning. “We live in a time where we expect someone to show up knowing everything and we don’t give them anything. We act like they should be grateful for bits and pieces of a job, ”Gordon said. Pande added that “you are expected to learn by osmosis and stand over someone’s shoulder, but it’s incredibly difficult to do it when you already feel marginalized and you are not allowed to ask questions.

Speaking on the ongoing direct action, Shelly Romero cited the new Carolyn Kroll Reidy Memorial Scholarship from Simon & Schuster, which will allow a diverse applicant to attend the Denver Publishing Institute, but stressed that “these scholarships are limited to only a few beneficiaries and programs remain financially inaccessible to many. ”Jason Low said his publishing company created the Lee & Low and Friends Scholarship, which allows a BIPOC student to attend the Center for the Study of Children’s Literature from Simmons University. “But I wonder if the teachers in these programs are themselves diverse,” he said.

Citing his own challenge of finding a publisher for his book, Gordon wondered which publisher would become the champion of authors of color. After pointing out that she had only worked in publishing since the start of the year, Bloxson said she was always learning more about the industry, but that Hachette had created a subcommittee of the diversity of volunteers who worked on the recruitment strategy for BIPOC employees at all levels. , from freelancers to management. The committee, she added, is aimed at candidates who may not have worked in publishing but have adjacent skills. They use an adapted version of the National Football League’s “Rooney rule”, which requires having a BIPOC candidate at all levels of the recruiting process. “Hopefully this is all a step forward,” said Bloxson.



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The source | Pusha-T claims ‘they won’t publish’ children’s book he’s been trying to write for years https://intrepidmouse.com/the-source-pusha-t-claims-they-wont-publish-childrens-book-hes-been-trying-to-write-for-years/ https://intrepidmouse.com/the-source-pusha-t-claims-they-wont-publish-childrens-book-hes-been-trying-to-write-for-years/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 12:02:03 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/the-source-pusha-t-claims-they-wont-publish-childrens-book-hes-been-trying-to-write-for-years/ Would you buy a children’s book for your child created by Pusha-T? Fan took to Twitter to reveal he reverse engineered Clipse’s “Keys Open Doors” Hell has no fury album with an educational touch for her little one. “I know what it’s written about, but when I play Keys Open Doors for my 2 year […]]]>


Would you buy a children’s book for your child created by Pusha-T?

Fan took to Twitter to reveal he reverse engineered Clipse’s “Keys Open Doors” Hell has no fury album with an educational touch for her little one.

“I know what it’s written about, but when I play Keys Open Doors for my 2 year old it’s actually a non-double educational song,” user @thekolsky said, alluding to how the track can be used to teach a child how to literally use a door key. “I say Clipse is for children. Shout @PUSHA_T. “

The quote from Pusha-T tweeted the fan and revealed that he actually attempted to publish a children’s book but failed.

“Thanks and I’ve been trying to write a children’s book for years… they won’t publish me,” Push said, ending with a sad-faced emoji.

Journalist Keith Nelson Jr. jokingly noted the GOD Music chief’s drug references on countless records. “‘What does he REALLY mean by Snow White?'” King Push weighed in on that one as well, saying, “A simple metaphor can be the death of you.”





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