Bedtime Story – Intrepid Mouse http://intrepidmouse.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:59:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://intrepidmouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Bedtime Story – Intrepid Mouse http://intrepidmouse.com/ 32 32 Step Notes: The program provides theater training for people with disabilities https://intrepidmouse.com/step-notes-the-program-provides-theater-training-for-people-with-disabilities/ https://intrepidmouse.com/step-notes-the-program-provides-theater-training-for-people-with-disabilities/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:06:58 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/step-notes-the-program-provides-theater-training-for-people-with-disabilities/ Breadcrumb Links Theater Local arts Entertainment Author of the article: Liane faulder Release date : 04 June 2021 • 54 minutes ago • 4 minutes to read • Join the conversation Caspar Ryan Faith Moon Photo Credit Tim Matheson Realwheels Story by Liane Faulder for YOU on a new acting program in Vancouver called Realwheels […]]]>


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A new training program for actors innovates in a profession with few entry points for people with disabilities.

Based in Vancouver, but open to people with disabilities across the country, Realwheels Acting Academy is accepting applications until June 30 for a three-year pilot program that will provide theater, voice and movement training to those who identify with the community of people with disabilities. from deaf artists to physically disabled or neurodiverse (eg, those living with autism).

Amy Amantea is chair of the board of directors of Realwheels, the Vancouver-based theater company that started the drama school. For nearly 20 years, the group has presented works featuring disabled people.

Amantea went blind at the age of 20 in 2007. She had been playing since she was a child, but gave up when she lost her sight.

“I was like, ‘who’s going to want a blind actor?'” She said in a phone interview from Vancouver.

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But after attending a Realwheels production, Amantea got involved in the company and has been acting ever since.

But it wasn’t easy to get roles. Amantea says roles for people with disabilities make up only 2% of stage and screen roles, and most of them are filled by able-bodied performers.

“When I don’t see my stories and myself represented, it hurts tremendously,” she says. “… This is one of the reasons the drama academy is so important.”

Composed of professionals at the peak of their art, the academy will offer a part-time program adapted to students. This means that the program adapts to them, not the other way around.

“There are so many barriers to the education and training of (disabled) actors,” Amantea explains, noting that traditional theater programs may offer classes at 8 a.m., which may not be possible for them. people who depend on a personal assistant for dressing.

Amantea sees the actor program as a way to help increase the representation of actors with disabilities in professional productions, where entry barriers are also high. She says something basic, like accessing a script for an audition in a form she can read, can be difficult.

It’s also intimidating for actors with disabilities when they see roles that highlight disability go to actors who don’t, like Eddie Redmayne in The Theory of Everything (about Stephen Hawking) or Riz Ahmed, a hearing actor who plays a musician who loses his hearing in Sound of Metal.

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But there are encouraging signs of change, as creators with disabilities take “ownership of their own content,” Amantea says, pointing to Ryan O’Connell – a gay American actor with cerebral palsy and the creator of Special on Netflix.

The next step, says Amantea, is to include actors with disabilities in the distribution of productions that are not disability-focused.

“My hope is that people with disabilities don’t limit themselves to this kind of work and can fit into mainstream work and integrate,” she says. ” I would like too

like being your Starbucks barista. This is representation.

For more information on the Realwheels training program, visit realwheels.ca.

• • •

The Concrete Theater commissioned two Edmonton artists, Helen Belay and Richard Lee, to create short online videos for Transformations, a National Arts Center project that asks artists “what would it take to transform our society for the better?” good of all?

Belay has written a short but rich story called Like This, which tells the story of the connection she feels between her homeland and her home. Richard Lee’s Side Shave celebrates empathy – and “dance like a fool”. Both works are featured on Concrete’s website at concretetheatre.ca/community.

• • •

There’s good news about the Found Festival, the annual exploration of creativity in unexpected spaces that’s hosted by local artists, sisters and producers, Megan Dart and Beth Dart of Common Ground Arts Society.

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Last year, the festival was seen both online and live (in cleverly distanced scenarios). This year there will also be a combination of digital programming and remote in-person work through fully local programming. More details will be revealed soon, but be aware that the festival takes place from July 8 to 11.

Common Ground Arts Society is also presenting the world premiere of Major Matt Mason Collective’s production of Night, by Geoffrey Simon Brown. The dance and theater performance, which runs at 10 p.m. June 17-24, and again June 24-26, is a live performance in a secret outdoor location. (Well, not so secret that you won’t know where it is in your way, but secret for now.) For more ticket information, keep your eyes on Major Matt Mason’s website.

• • •

The International Children’s Arts Festival has been offering live performances online since April. But the festival ends this weekend with a triumphant finale featuring bands like The Ministry of Mundane Mysteries and The Wizards of Oakwood Drive. I’m especially excited about the cozy story presented on Saturdays at 7 p.m. by Big Heart Journey. For details and tickets, visit st.albert.ca.

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Books and nostalgia | The Daily Star https://intrepidmouse.com/books-and-nostalgia-the-daily-star/ https://intrepidmouse.com/books-and-nostalgia-the-daily-star/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 08:30:38 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/books-and-nostalgia-the-daily-star/ There is something very interesting about the way certain scents take you back in time, much like a time machine would, if it ever existed. I was to start this column today by writing about my favorite book. But flipping through the dented copy of my all-time favorite, Erich Segal’s Class, I realized that it […]]]>


There is something very interesting about the way certain scents take you back in time, much like a time machine would, if it ever existed.

I was to start this column today by writing about my favorite book. But flipping through the dented copy of my all-time favorite, Erich Segal’s Class, I realized that it would be better to explore and share the memories with this book on another day. Standing in front of my library, looking for a book to write about for my first column, suddenly turned into a trail of memory. Every book I looked at had a personal story, it took me back to my school days and even times as far back as I could barely reach the top of a bookshelf!

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Small white bailiff the petals can bring back the astonishment you once felt at the typical 90s sight of a rickshaw on the streets of Dhaka, pedaling in the rain with more than six young passengers all huddled together; colognes can remind you of those forbidden passionate nights; burnt toast from long gone school days, to rush to catch the bus. New books may remind you of morning tea in Nilkhet; and shoe polish, casual weekends with your dad. Sounds the same with the gold hits and songs you grew up listening to, tunes that make you nostalgic and yearn for the days of fun and freedom. Bibliophiles will claim the same when they see the cover of a book, or hear an author’s name or a title they once cherished. They think back to the characters they fell in love with and wonder why they don’t now realize the passion they had for reading for hours together, oblivious to the world going by.

My bookshelf is filled with books of all kinds, starting with books on politics, Bengali grammar and shomogro (collections) of various writers and characters from popular books, to the Harry Potter series and photocopied versions of Shakespeare from my college days. There are books that wear out over time, but I just don’t have the heart to take them out or give them away. Six centuries of great poetry bought in the late 90s from Al Jarir Bookstore, one of my favorite bookstores, where I grew up; a large copy of Many more bedtime stories that my father had bought for me, which I suspect was partially eaten by rats; an old Oxford dictionary – a gift for the 10th anniversary; and a set of books from my father’s shelf from the 1980s, essays written by some of the greatest thinkers and scholars of all time. When I look at them, I am filled with memories.

Do schools still have libraries? And is it still obligatory for young students to borrow books from the library like we should, once a week? I am not sure! I haven’t been back to school in ages! But I know it’s all digital now, and luckily for book lovers and readers alike, new versions can be viewed online and bought or rented almost immediately. I’m sure today’s readers would be surprised at how a school library operated in the 90s.

My school library wasn’t huge, but it wasn’t tiny either. Walls lined with wooden shelves, the room mostly filled with chairs and tables for students to quietly come to read or make references for projects. Librarian Ms Elizabeth Mathew, a tall and gentle lady from Kerala, India, was always on the lookout for students she could put to work to organize the books scattered on the tables, make sure they were placed in the right shelves in the right categories and so on. Shipments of new books would come in every few months and that’s when most students did their best to stay away from the library and Ms. Mathew.

Ms Mathew would have the students help her empty every box and box, filled with travel dust covering the books, record the details of authors, titles and number each book according to category and genre. Notice, dear readers, this was all done by hand, with the old-fashioned pen in big ledger-type notebooks. Each book would have pages with school emblem stamps and the very last page of the book would have a pocket-like structure glued with library cards. Students were allowed to borrow or publish a book for a week (or longer if needed) and their names were listed on the respective library card. So if you borrowed or issued a book from the library, you could actually see on the map who had borrowed it before you did.

I loved every minute of the whole process! I would sometimes skip class just to watch the librarian unload the boxes, yell at the students to help dust the books, turn the pages to make sure they were all there, start the categorization task, and finally get each book ready. for publication. “You girl!” she would say. “Don’t think I can’t see you!” You’re still skipping class, aren’t you? Take this stack of books from this table first, then run to class!

I brought her the stack of books she wanted, then sat next to her on the floor, sorting through the many versions of the Atlas she had just pulled out of the box marked “Misc Stationary”. I would see Mrs. Mathew’s eyes shine at the sight of the new Atlases! In silence, she and I began to mark, stamp and categorize each of the books, forgetting everything to send this student back to class!

Two of my most cherished possessions as a child were The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L Frank Baum and Sunbeam Rabbit Country by Vsevolod Nestaĭko. The books were big and heavy, each page filled with beautiful illustrations, and they had cost a fortune! My chacha (paternal uncle), Rezaul Karim, who was a young man living on a budget like any other middle class young man in the late 80s, bought these books for me at the New Market in Chittagong and never realized how they ended up would be read, reread and stay with me forever. Or maybe not forever! I was no more than six or seven when I got hold of these books and cherished them until I was 18. Sadly, moving my home in the Middle East to my homeland, Bangladesh, caused me to lose a lot of the things I had cherished. then — posters, magazines, notebooks, weird wooden jewelry, handmade friendship bands, slam books, and a first draft of the Geetobitan with favorite lines and songs marked in pencil by my parents, including the books I had cherished for so long.

Dramas in the Bard’s dramas, descriptions of picnics in the gardens in Georgian times, a young woman dreaming of a utopian world where women are free, a young man wandering in a yellow Punjabi, and brooding romantic heroes making you wish they were real – it’s crazy how simple pages tied together manage to free you, comfort you, heal you, and how they let you discover a whole new world than you, otherwise, had no idea of ​​existence!

Elita karim is a journalist, musician and editor-in-chief of Star Arts & Entertainment and Star Youth, The star of everyday life. She tweets @elitakarim.



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Lo-Fi Genre Buster Delivers Cinematic Shake https://intrepidmouse.com/lo-fi-genre-buster-delivers-cinematic-shake/ https://intrepidmouse.com/lo-fi-genre-buster-delivers-cinematic-shake/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 12:20:27 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/lo-fi-genre-buster-delivers-cinematic-shake/ It’s rare for a new American movie to feel truly alive with possibilities from start to finish. So many of the logistical, economic and technological decisions that go into making a film in the United States are designed to stifle the artistic vision in favor of audience accessibility. Which means something infinitely weird and fractured […]]]>


It’s rare for a new American movie to feel truly alive with possibilities from start to finish. So many of the logistical, economic and technological decisions that go into making a film in the United States are designed to stifle the artistic vision in favor of audience accessibility. Which means something infinitely weird and fractured like Slow machine feels all the more essential, an eccentric celluloid shape-shifting lever shot in 16mm that playfully upends the tropes of narrative storytelling.

Paul Felten and Joe DeNardo’s low-fi genre buster follows Stephanie (Stephanie Hayes), a Swedish experimental theater actress based in Brooklyn who meets a mysterious government agent named Gerard (Scott Sheperd). Instead of being thrown into a world of intrigue and clandestine operations, Stephanie must endure the occasional seductions and clumsy theorizations of Gerard, much of which revolves around her invisible fiancé’s thesis on narrative archetypes in the story. pornography.

Their interactions are mostly depicted in flashbacks, penetrating different moments in time when Stephanie, now sporting a Southern accent, retreated to musician Eleanor’s (Eleanor Friedberger) upstate farm to escape Return. of flame that Gerard has created in his life. In doing so, Slow machine weaves a subversive web of overlapping narratives that are constantly in conflict, each shaped by music and performances that vibrate with kinetic energy.

At the heart of it all is a freewheeling sense of fantasy that allows the characters to Slow machine embrace the coincidences and bitter jealousies of life without being unbearably terrible. Despite his violent tendencies and epic mood swings, Gerard speaks like a charming shmuck version of Bogart, a little too eager to erase the norms of societal boundaries to make a personal connection. At one point, he even describes himself as “emotionally promiscuous.”

Hayes’ chameleon-like performance is even more impressive as she effortlessly adapts to any situation. Apparently every moment she is dealing with a different predator, like her aggressively gruesome roommates or the unwanted advances of a hipster who loves the poetry of William Blake, her “back in college man”.

But the key scene of Slow machine has to be where Chloë Sevigny (playing herself) recounts a mysterious and memorable audition involving an unfinished script presented to her by an anonymous writer. The anticipation in her voice as she reflects on the serpentine process mirrors that of an artist poised to be reborn through an incomplete and incomplete cinematic process.

Somehow Felton and DeNardo did just that with Slow machine, denying any sort of enclosure or overarching context in order to reach a deeper truth about the stories we tell in order to rekindle our passions for life. Or more specifically, being at peace with the chaos this world brings, both in real life and in the art we choose to spend hours obsessed with. The film’s brilliant final scene involving a Zoom bedtime story with no real direction or conclusion is entirely symbolic of that sentiment.

If American cinema is ever going to transcend the mundane, shapeless superhero fantasies that have occupied so much mental and physical space over the past decade, more films like Slow machine will be necessary to get us out of our collective complacency. For the curious and eager, it’s a nice reminder of what it’s like to be properly strangled by an unexpected cinematic shake.

Slow machine opens Friday June 4 on Projectr.tv.



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Children who sleep with their pets are still getting enough rest, researchers say. https://intrepidmouse.com/children-who-sleep-with-their-pets-are-still-getting-enough-rest-researchers-say/ https://intrepidmouse.com/children-who-sleep-with-their-pets-are-still-getting-enough-rest-researchers-say/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 19:04:56 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/children-who-sleep-with-their-pets-are-still-getting-enough-rest-researchers-say/ Credit: Citrix / public domain CC0 There is a long held belief that putting a pet to bed is a bad idea. Along with clutter, noisy scratches, and allergy induction, the most common claim is that a hairy companion is interfering with sleep. New research published in the journal Sleep health Tell another story. Researchers […]]]>


Credit: Citrix / public domain CC0

There is a long held belief that putting a pet to bed is a bad idea. Along with clutter, noisy scratches, and allergy induction, the most common claim is that a hairy companion is interfering with sleep.

New research published in the journal Sleep health Tell another story. Researchers at the Concordia Institute for Pediatric Public Health Psychology (PPHP) sleep The quality of the surprising number of children who share a bed with their pets is no different from those who sleep alone.

Lead author of the treatise, Ph.D. said: Student Hillary Rowe. “In fact, children who sleep with their pets often promote good quality sleep.”

Rowe co-authored a treatise with fellow PHPP researchers Denise Jarrin, Neressa Noel, Joanne Ramil, and psychology professor and institute director Jennifer McGrath.

Accidental discovery

The data used by the researchers was discovered in a large study. Healthy Heart Project, longitudinal study Funded by the Canadian Institute of Health, we are studying the relationship between stress in children, sleep and the circadian rhythm.

Children and parents completed the Bedtime Routine Questionnaire Sleep Hygiene: Keep your bedtime consistent, establish a relaxation routine before bedtime, and sleep in a quiet, comfortable space. For two weeks, the children wore wearables (wrist actigraphy) and connected daily to track their sleep. The children were also fitted with a dedicated home polysomnography machine at night to allow researchers to record brain waves (EEG signals) during sleep.

“One of the questions about sleep hygiene asked me if I shared a bed with my pet,” says McGrath. “We were surprised that one in three children answered ‘yes’. “

Following this discovery, they studied what the existing literature says about bed sharing with animals. They found a few studies on adults, but few on adolescents.

“Sleeping with pets is something a lot of kids do, but I don’t know how it affects their sleep,” Rowe adds. “So a sleep science perspective. So I thought that was an important thing to consider. “

Shedding light on sleep measurements

The researchers classified the children into one of three groups based on how often they sleep with their pets: we then compared the three groups across a wide range of sleep variables to see if there were any. had a significant difference between them.

“Given the big goals of the Healthy Heart Project, we were able to see not only the bedtime and the time of sleep (hours), but also the time of onset of sleep (latent), waking up at night ( interruption) and the quality of sleep. “McGlass says. They found that the three groups were generally similar in all dimensions of sleep.

“The results suggest that the presence of pets did not adversely affect sleep,” Rowe points out. “In fact, a child who slept with a pet The quality of sleep Especially in adolescents. “

She hypothesizes that children tend to view their pets as friends and sleep with them for comfort.

“These results further refine our thinking on how to improve our techniques for measuring sleep,” adds McGrath.

“Many wearable devices like the Apple Watch and Fitbit, or even the smartphone itself, have accelerometers that detect movement and decode sleep. Given the number of people sharing a bed with partners and pets, it may be wise to develop a collaborative framework. Using sleep to tune the algorithms used to define sleep invasion or awakening allows for a much more accurate sleep assessment. . ”


Sleeping with your pet does not interfere with your child’s sleep.


For more information:
Hillary Row et al., Strange Nighttime Dog Events: The Impact of Pet and Human Cosleeping and Bed Sharing on the Sleep Dimension of Children and Adolescents, Sleep health (2021). DOI: 10.1016 / j.sleh.2021.02.007

Provided by
Concordia University

Quote: Kids Sleeping With Pets Always Sleep Better, Researchers Find (June 2, 2021) June 2, 2021, https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-06- Obtained from kids-pet-good-night-rest .html

This document is subject to copyright. No part may be reproduced without written permission except for private research or fair trade research purposes. The content is provided for informational purposes only.

Children who sleep with their pets are still getting enough rest, researchers say.

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What to know before staying in a hotel again, according to experts https://intrepidmouse.com/what-to-know-before-staying-in-a-hotel-again-according-to-experts/ https://intrepidmouse.com/what-to-know-before-staying-in-a-hotel-again-according-to-experts/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 18:35:56 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/what-to-know-before-staying-in-a-hotel-again-according-to-experts/ Exercise due diligence Before getting on a plane or taking the road, familiarize yourself with the current of your destination rules and regulations. Check national and international tourism websites for regional mandates and continue to follow CDC guidelines. And just because public spaces may have lifted restrictions for things like social distancing and masks, it […]]]>


Exercise due diligence

Before getting on a plane or taking the road, familiarize yourself with the current of your destination rules and regulations. Check national and international tourism websites for regional mandates and continue to follow CDC guidelines. And just because public spaces may have lifted restrictions for things like social distancing and masks, it doesn’t necessarily mean your hotel has.

“Travelers should know that hotels should not only follow the guidelines of national regulations, but also corporate regulations,” says Taylor Combs, director of sales at Sheraton and Wyndham Garden in Niagara Falls. “Each hotel chain has its own set of guidelines that managed and franchised hotels must adhere to. And nothing is permanent: we’ve all seen that Covid mandates can change by the minute.

If you don’t know what to expect, Kylie Shmida, Experience Manager at The Surfjack Hotel & Swim Club in Oahu, recommend calling your hotel prior to your stay. “We have a wealth of information and are more than happy to show you how you can travel in a more sustainable way, or share local shops or restaurants that need a little more love these days. “

“In order to remain open and allow tourists to explore … we need everyone’s cooperation as we navigate this new world of travel together,” adds Liliana Mascolo, Public Relations and Communications Manager of the Poseidon Hotel in Positano, Italy.



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Pandemic leads Wiedenbeck to write and publish children’s books | Community https://intrepidmouse.com/pandemic-leads-wiedenbeck-to-write-and-publish-childrens-books-community/ https://intrepidmouse.com/pandemic-leads-wiedenbeck-to-write-and-publish-childrens-books-community/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 18:45:00 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/pandemic-leads-wiedenbeck-to-write-and-publish-childrens-books-community/ Kids know how Santa Claus spends on December 24th, but what does the man in the red suit do after all the presents have been delivered? It’s a question Kaylor Wiedenbeck’s daughter Holly has asked frequently. So the 27-year-old Waterloo resident decided to tell Holly a story. That story turned into “When Santa Goes Home,” […]]]>


Kids know how Santa Claus spends on December 24th, but what does the man in the red suit do after all the presents have been delivered? It’s a question Kaylor Wiedenbeck’s daughter Holly has asked frequently.

So the 27-year-old Waterloo resident decided to tell Holly a story. That story turned into “When Santa Goes Home,” a little rhyming book for children under 100 words, which was released in March.

It was the pandemic that prompted Wiedenbeck, a 2011 Waterloo High School graduate, to write stories for her two children Holly and Shepherd.

“When the COVID-19 pandemic started, I was on maternity leave after working full time in finance. I had an 18 month old and newborn baby to entertain for several weeks while my husband (Mitchell) worked. We were bored. The weather was gloomy, our local library was temporarily closed, and we had read all of our books dozens of times. I needed new stories to tell, ”she says. “So I started to write mine.”

The Waterloo woman said “When Santa Goes Home” was written entirely for her children. The story introduces some of Santa’s hobbies and bedtime snack time.

Wiedenbeck worked with Junior McLean from the East Coast, who illustrated the Christmas-themed book. The couple collaborated in the virtual creation of the colorful images. The 27-year-old said it was sometimes difficult to describe the type of images she wanted to accompany the text.

“I’m not an illustrator by any means, so I had an idea of ​​what I wanted this to look like, but I didn’t know how to say, ‘Use this tool on the editing software,'” he said. she declared. “In the end, I just wrote each line, then put a small paragraph below explaining what I wanted to show.”

The decision to publish “When Santa Goes Home” came with encouragement from Wiedenbeck’s mother, Kris Detert.

“She always told me that I’m a good writer and that I should keep going and I never really thought about it, but I thought it was a short story my kids love it I have to other people whose kids might like it, so it’s not really going to hurt to put me there, ”the writer said.

Wiedenbeck also received encouragement from her husband and a close friend, who even helped provide comments and make edits.

The Waterloo woman’s second book, “I Love You More Than Burgers,” was inspired by her husband and is now available for purchase online with copies soon to be available locally.

“He obviously loves our kids more than anything, but he doesn’t show it the same way I do,” Wiedenbeck said. “He doesn’t say it 20 times a day and smother them with hugs and kisses like I do, but he shows it by building forts, letting them climb all over him, and a great thing is sharing his food. His favorite food is cheeseburgers, so when he offers them a bite to eat, I can see how much he loves them.

The writer wanted to publish a book on how dads show their love for their children after seeing many children’s books focusing on how mothers show affection for their children.

“I love you more than cheese burgers” also has a little more humor and is double the word count of “When Santa Comes Home”.

For this book, Wiedenbeck worked with Kellen Roggenbuck, an artist based in Jefferson.

“I’m really happy to have his help because I’m still new to this area – I don’t know what I’m doing,” she said.

Wiedenbeck did not expect that the story she told her children would lead to becoming a published writer; she just thought she was jotting down stories to keep the couple entertained for the long period of time at home due to the pandemic.

She had always loved writing short stories in her English classes, but she had never seen a career outside of creative writing.

“I’m a very practical person, so I wanted to find a job right out of college to make sure I didn’t have to worry about trying to find something, so I decided to go for it. business instead, ”said the Carroll University graduate. “I like numbers too, so I was always torn between numbers and words.”

With two books published, Wiedenbeck is giving himself a little more time to explore writing.

“I thought it was a good compromise – I can do numbers (at full time work) during the day and words with my kids at night and on weekends,” she said. “I’m glad I decided to continue writing and grateful for all the support.”



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Car books for kids who love cars https://intrepidmouse.com/car-books-for-kids-who-love-cars/ https://intrepidmouse.com/car-books-for-kids-who-love-cars/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 23:28:24 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/car-books-for-kids-who-love-cars/ Dutton’s book for young readers It’s hard to beat a good bedtime story. Not only can they help hipsters fall asleep, but they can also create bonds of comfort and happy memories by reading books to their children. Who doesn’t want it? Another advantage of children’s books is that they can be taken anywhere. Car […]]]>


Dutton’s book for young readers

It’s hard to beat a good bedtime story. Not only can they help hipsters fall asleep, but they can also create bonds of comfort and happy memories by reading books to their children. Who doesn’t want it?

Another advantage of children’s books is that they can be taken anywhere. Car ride, doctor’s appointment or weekend with grandmother. These are also great assets for road trips, some featuring cars and trucks to be found on the highway.

So here are some of my favorite and adored car books for kids. Hansel and Gretel..

For even better activities to keep your child entertained for hours Please check out R&T Crew magazine and subscription box with all kinds of auto themed toys and tasks.

8 children’s car movies


T for turbo: ABC book

This ABC book is perfect for little mechanics. Each letter indicates a particular car part and its use. If you want to introduce your child to the world of rental, here is a book for you to get.

Good night, little blue trail

This n ° 1 New York Times The bestseller is the perfect bedtime story. Little Blue Track and his friends return home as the storm blows the path. Even with big thunder and bright lightning bolts, it’s easy to be brave together.

Fast forward

This amazing book contains a bit of information about the world’s most famous circuits, cars and drivers. Soon your child will leave the story of Au Rouge. And with almost 80 pages, there is no lack of interesting information.

Hongk on the road!

This sturdy hardback book features 10 audio buttons for large, colorful pages. It’s a great road trip book that encourages kids to find their favorite electric machine.

Hot Wheels: Race to Win

This Hot Wheels Level 1 Paperback Book is perfect for emerging readers. The 32-page adventure follows four different runners and different strategies to win. With beautiful illustrations Race to win A solid entry-level choice for fans of small cars.

Cars, trucks and moving objects

This classic of children’s literature is still as fascinating as it was almost 50 years ago. The page contains a wide variety of cars, trucks, planes, trains and more, including the two-page pickle truck.

If I make a car

Guide your child’s inner inventor through this imaginative story. Follow his tour with the boy who built his car and showing the pool, snack bar and robot driver.

Noisy truck

This logbook is perfect for kids with items they can see, touch, and hear. It has clips of all kinds of trucks including monster trucks and semi-trailers, and the buttons provide realistic sound. Remember to bend the horn of the arm.

Small Cars Guest Book

Lightning McQueen is one of the most beloved children’s characters to date. When he gets lost on his way to the Piston Cup, following him in this book can help him learn a lot to become a true friend. This is a great page-by-page retail of Pixar movies.

let’s go!

This book is the ideal companion for your road trip. Elephant Tuski goes on an adventure, but friends, things… pancakes? Use a lot of stuff to find out how a red cab breaks it.

This content is created and maintained by third parties and imported to this page so that users can provide their email address. You can find more information on similar content at piano.io.

Car books for kids who love cars

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She put her unspent love in a cardboard box https://intrepidmouse.com/she-put-her-unspent-love-in-a-cardboard-box/ https://intrepidmouse.com/she-put-her-unspent-love-in-a-cardboard-box/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 06:55:52 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/she-put-her-unspent-love-in-a-cardboard-box/ On the morning of my high school graduation, a strand of pearls made a sound like a maraca as I pulled them out of the box. Her note read, “There seemed to be a tradition in my family that when girls graduated from high school they were given a pearl necklace. Well my pearl necklace […]]]>


On the morning of my high school graduation, a strand of pearls made a sound like a maraca as I pulled them out of the box. Her note read, “There seemed to be a tradition in my family that when girls graduated from high school they were given a pearl necklace. Well my pearl necklace never arrived.

That’s because my mom, going on an adventure, skipped her senior year and bought herself these pearls after graduating from business school. She wanted me to know that there was more than one way to go around the world and that I deserved to be celebrated. I wore the beads this afternoon as I walked across the football field to receive my diploma.

Year after year, my mother has traveled through time to meet me, always in the form of a small package with a pink ribbon and a small white card: “Happy 15th!” “Happy 16!” “Congratulations on your driver’s license!” “You are a student! “Happy 21st!” “Happy Birthday darling! Love, your mom.

Every time I opened the box, I could, in the shortest time, inhabit a shared reality, something she had envisioned for us many years ago. It was like a half-remembered perfume, the first notes of a familiar song, each time, a little glimpse of her.

When I was a child, opening the next package was like a treasure hunt. As I got older it started to feel like something much more basic, like air or community, something like prayer. His messages met me like landmarks in a dark forest; if his words couldn’t lead the way, at least they offered the comfort of knowing someone had been here before.

A decade after losing my mother, my father suddenly followed suit. She had spent years preparing for his release, but with him I blinked and he was gone. On the morning of its memorial, the box stared at me silently. There was no letter for it.



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In the eye of Dillocane we are alive https://intrepidmouse.com/in-the-eye-of-dillocane-we-are-alive/ https://intrepidmouse.com/in-the-eye-of-dillocane-we-are-alive/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 04:36:17 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/in-the-eye-of-dillocane-we-are-alive/ Northwestern students celebrate many different holidays, such as Christmas, Easter, Eid al-Fitr, Mawlid-al-Nabi, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, among many others. Regardless of your faith, there is one holiday that most students in the Northwest celebrate, and that is the Great Dillo Festival. Dillo Day is a special day on a Saturday late in the […]]]>


Northwestern students celebrate many different holidays, such as Christmas, Easter, Eid al-Fitr, Mawlid-al-Nabi, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, among many others. Regardless of your faith, there is one holiday that most students in the Northwest celebrate, and that is the Great Dillo Festival.

Dillo Day is a special day on a Saturday late in the Spring District when musical artists come to the Northwest and perform for students and their guests. Guests, as a term, are pretty vague – I remember smuggling a fraternity alumni or two in 2019 to watch Teyana Taylor. and A $ AP Ferg. Drinking is an important part of Dillo Day, in the standard college, “we won’t know unless you really mess up” way. (For future reference, Chicken Shack on Emerson Street and Clarke’s, now on Davis Street, are remarkable hangover remedies).

In 2020, Dillo Day was canceled, like all of the other fun celebrations this year. In 2021, however, Northwestern hosted a Virtual Dillo Day with Omar Apollo and Playboi Carti as headliners. Haven’t watched anything since applying for summer internships and going to Howard Street For alimentation. But I noticed one thing while riding a bike.

Evanston lived with people.

For the first time in a year, I saw the entire faces of the people. On the pavement. I no longer need to guess who someone is based on their forehead. Now I can see their faces and act on them. Had to wait 20 minutes at Cold Stone Creamery that night.

All of my statements, in any other year, would be bland enough for a bedtime story. But I and all of the readers of this article have just experienced a generational pandemic. I have been in Evanston for almost a year, from summer 2020 to late spring 2021, and have never seen so much joy and fun as I have seen the Dillo day. I realized that I missed the banality of university life.

Two things fell on Dillo just to make Evanston eclectic.

First, the Centers for Disease Control and the State of Illinois have proclaimed that it is not necessary to wear masks outside, given what we know about the spread of the coronavirus. Second, the day before, Northwestern’s website reported that there had been 0 cases of coronavirus in the previous week. No case among students, staff or faculty – people, it was a miracle and a prime example of how effective vaccines are.

Is the global pandemic over? No, of course not, as I wrote before. One day, however, Evanston got a glimpse of what post-pandemic life could be like. And this life was beautiful. Hopefully fall 2021 will shine even brighter.

Sterling Ortiz is a junior from SESP. He can be contacted at [email protected]. If you would like to respond publicly to this editorial, send a letter to the editor at [email protected]. The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of all members of the staff at The Daily Northwestern.

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LIBRARY NOTES: Brighton and Mendon https://intrepidmouse.com/library-notes-brighton-and-mendon/ https://intrepidmouse.com/library-notes-brighton-and-mendon/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 15:43:35 +0000 https://intrepidmouse.com/library-notes-brighton-and-mendon/ The Brighton Memorial Library has announced upcoming programs. “Top 10 Tips for a Happy Dog”: 2pm to 3pm May 27th via Zoom. For adults. Alex and Rebecca from Young Lion Training and Behavior will discuss concrete actions dog owners can take to brighten up their dog’s day and help them live more fulfilling lives. Questions […]]]>


The Brighton Memorial Library has announced upcoming programs.

“Top 10 Tips for a Happy Dog”: 2pm to 3pm May 27th via Zoom. For adults. Alex and Rebecca from Young Lion Training and Behavior will discuss concrete actions dog owners can take to brighten up their dog’s day and help them live more fulfilling lives. Questions and answers included. Registration required.

“Question of Sanity”: 11 am June 1 via YouTube Premier. For adults. Local history author Michael Keene presents “Question of Sanity: The True Story of Female Serial Killers in 19th-Century New York”. Call or email deena.viviani@libraryweb.org to register.

Zoom Writing workshop: 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on June 2. For adults. Participants will listen to and respond to each other by identifying the strengths of each piece and, if they wish, constructive feedback will be provided. Pieces limited to 1000 words. Call or email deena.viviani@libraryweb.org to register.

In progress

Read to Lily: 3 p.m. Wednesday and 4 p.m. Thursday via Google Meet. Lily, a beagle mixed therapy dog, is ready to hear stories. Call or email caitlyn.stahovic@libraryweb.org to register.



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